Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301312
Title:
Impacts of the Arizona Groundwater Act on Tucson Water
Author:
Davis, Stephen E.
Affiliation:
Tucson Water, Tucson, Arizona 85726
Issue Date:
24-Apr-1982
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The 1980 Arizona Groundwater Management Act is the product of decades of court decisions and years of work and negotiation by representatives of the State's major water users, members of the State Legislature, and the Governor. The Act intends to conserve and manage the State's groundwater resources through the establishment of the Arizona Department of Water Resources (DWR). The Tucson Active Management Area (TAMA) is one of four geographical areas specifically designated within the legislation. There is established a Tucson office, locally staffed and administered by the DWR. The legislated goal for the TAMA is to balance groundwater withdrawal with dependable supplies by the year 2025. A series of time -specific management plans will incorporate conservation, supply augmentation, and farmland retirement to fulfill the 2025 goal. This paper discusses the existing and projected TAMA water supply/demand imbalance assuming no groundwater management and potential impacts of the Act on management and customers of the Tucson Water Utility. Specific positive impacts include increased public awareness, regional metered water use information, and reduction in groundwater overdraft. Specific negative impacts include more regulation, higher customer water rates, reduced water quality, and potential growth limitations.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleImpacts of the Arizona Groundwater Act on Tucson Wateren_US
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Stephen E.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentTucson Water, Tucson, Arizona 85726en_US
dc.date.issued1982-04-24-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe 1980 Arizona Groundwater Management Act is the product of decades of court decisions and years of work and negotiation by representatives of the State's major water users, members of the State Legislature, and the Governor. The Act intends to conserve and manage the State's groundwater resources through the establishment of the Arizona Department of Water Resources (DWR). The Tucson Active Management Area (TAMA) is one of four geographical areas specifically designated within the legislation. There is established a Tucson office, locally staffed and administered by the DWR. The legislated goal for the TAMA is to balance groundwater withdrawal with dependable supplies by the year 2025. A series of time -specific management plans will incorporate conservation, supply augmentation, and farmland retirement to fulfill the 2025 goal. This paper discusses the existing and projected TAMA water supply/demand imbalance assuming no groundwater management and potential impacts of the Act on management and customers of the Tucson Water Utility. Specific positive impacts include increased public awareness, regional metered water use information, and reduction in groundwater overdraft. Specific negative impacts include more regulation, higher customer water rates, reduced water quality, and potential growth limitations.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301312-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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