Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301310
Title:
Potential Energy Resources of the Gulf of California, Northwestern Mexico
Author:
Popkin, Barney P.
Issue Date:
24-Apr-1982
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The Gulf of California in northwestern Mexico is a tropical sea of the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Earthquake activity is common in the region, especially towards the northwest where transform faults are associated with volcanic and geothermal activity, and features such as the San Andreas fault zone. The Gulf contains 132,000 cu km of seawater, with a surface area of 162,000 sq km, and a mean depth of 815 m. Its surface salinity is about 35 ppt. The Gulf is subject to the second highest tides (>10 m in range) in North America. The region is currently undergoing extensive human development and energy exploration. After reviewing the climatic, geologic, soil and vegetation, and oceanographic settings, the potential energy resources of the Gulf are evaluated. These resources include those controlled by climate (solar, wind), geology (hydrocarbon, geothermal), biology (biomass) and oceanography (tidal, wave, hydrothermal). Climatic energy sources (unproven technology) have fair potential for modest-scale, onshore and near-use development. Geologic sources are online, and have high potential for large-scale commercial development with export value. Biological sources (unproven technology) have low potential for small-scale, near-use development. Oceanographic sources have high potential for moderate -scale near-use potentially exportable development.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePotential Energy Resources of the Gulf of California, Northwestern Mexicoen_US
dc.contributor.authorPopkin, Barney P.en_US
dc.date.issued1982-04-24-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe Gulf of California in northwestern Mexico is a tropical sea of the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Earthquake activity is common in the region, especially towards the northwest where transform faults are associated with volcanic and geothermal activity, and features such as the San Andreas fault zone. The Gulf contains 132,000 cu km of seawater, with a surface area of 162,000 sq km, and a mean depth of 815 m. Its surface salinity is about 35 ppt. The Gulf is subject to the second highest tides (>10 m in range) in North America. The region is currently undergoing extensive human development and energy exploration. After reviewing the climatic, geologic, soil and vegetation, and oceanographic settings, the potential energy resources of the Gulf are evaluated. These resources include those controlled by climate (solar, wind), geology (hydrocarbon, geothermal), biology (biomass) and oceanography (tidal, wave, hydrothermal). Climatic energy sources (unproven technology) have fair potential for modest-scale, onshore and near-use development. Geologic sources are online, and have high potential for large-scale commercial development with export value. Biological sources (unproven technology) have low potential for small-scale, near-use development. Oceanographic sources have high potential for moderate -scale near-use potentially exportable development.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301310-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.