Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301304
Title:
Changes in Streamflow in an Herbicide-Treated Jumpier Watershed in Arizona
Author:
Baker, Malchus B., Jr.
Affiliation:
Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. Flagstaff, Arizona
Issue Date:
24-Apr-1982
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
A 147-ha juniper watershed in north -central Arizona was sprayed with an herbicide mixture to kill all overstory vegetation. After the area was sprayed, annual water yield increased significantly when flow was greater than 12 mm. The ratio of mean annual quick flow to event flow prior to treatment was 0.86 and remained essentially the same after treatment. The herbicide treatment reduced evapotranspiration losses and increased water yield by killing the overstory trees and leaving them in place. These dead trees provided some shade and wind resistance and created a microclimate that reduced evaporation and enabled the soil below 30 cm to remain above its soil moisture wilting point. Although mean annual water yield increased by 27% (6 mm, 8-year mean), this increase may not be practical from a management view point. Therefore, it is unlikely that extensive juniper acreage will be treated. The amount of treated acreage will depend on the demand for water and on the value of water in the market place. The area treated will also be constrained by consideration of other resource values and desires of the public.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleChanges in Streamflow in an Herbicide-Treated Jumpier Watershed in Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Malchus B., Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentRocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. Flagstaff, Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1982-04-24-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractA 147-ha juniper watershed in north -central Arizona was sprayed with an herbicide mixture to kill all overstory vegetation. After the area was sprayed, annual water yield increased significantly when flow was greater than 12 mm. The ratio of mean annual quick flow to event flow prior to treatment was 0.86 and remained essentially the same after treatment. The herbicide treatment reduced evapotranspiration losses and increased water yield by killing the overstory trees and leaving them in place. These dead trees provided some shade and wind resistance and created a microclimate that reduced evaporation and enabled the soil below 30 cm to remain above its soil moisture wilting point. Although mean annual water yield increased by 27% (6 mm, 8-year mean), this increase may not be practical from a management view point. Therefore, it is unlikely that extensive juniper acreage will be treated. The amount of treated acreage will depend on the demand for water and on the value of water in the market place. The area treated will also be constrained by consideration of other resource values and desires of the public.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301304-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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