Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301214
Title:
Candelilla/Petroleum Wax Mixtures for Treating Soils for water Harvesting
Author:
Fink, Dwayne H.
Affiliation:
U. S. Department of Agriculture, Science and Education Administration, U. S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Phoenix, AZ 85040
Issue Date:
2-May-1981
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
A vegetable wax (candelilla), alone or in combination with petroleum waxes, was evaluated for treating soils for water harvesting. Samples were alternately weathered in a freeze -thaw cycle chamber, tested for water repellency and structural stability against water erosion, then subjected to more weathering, etc., until sample failure occurred. Soils treated with candelilla/paraffin wax mixtures were much more resistant to laboratory freeze -thaw cycle weathering than those soils treated with either of the waxes alone. Weatherability was further improved, and wax requirement reduced by (1) prior stabilization of the soil with cellulose xanthate made from chemically pulped waste paper; (2) incorporating 28 of a commercial antistripping agent into the wax; and (3) substituting a residual type petroleum wax for the paraffin in the wax mixtures.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCandelilla/Petroleum Wax Mixtures for Treating Soils for water Harvestingen_US
dc.contributor.authorFink, Dwayne H.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentU. S. Department of Agriculture, Science and Education Administration, U. S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Phoenix, AZ 85040en_US
dc.date.issued1981-05-02-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractA vegetable wax (candelilla), alone or in combination with petroleum waxes, was evaluated for treating soils for water harvesting. Samples were alternately weathered in a freeze -thaw cycle chamber, tested for water repellency and structural stability against water erosion, then subjected to more weathering, etc., until sample failure occurred. Soils treated with candelilla/paraffin wax mixtures were much more resistant to laboratory freeze -thaw cycle weathering than those soils treated with either of the waxes alone. Weatherability was further improved, and wax requirement reduced by (1) prior stabilization of the soil with cellulose xanthate made from chemically pulped waste paper; (2) incorporating 28 of a commercial antistripping agent into the wax; and (3) substituting a residual type petroleum wax for the paraffin in the wax mixtures.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301214-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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