Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301203
Title:
Water Harvesting: Soil/Water Impacts of Salt Treatment
Author:
Todd, Albert H.
Affiliation:
USDA, Tahoe National Forest, Nevada City, California
Issue Date:
12-Apr-1980
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The responses of mined -land and natural soil materials to additions of various salt solutions in irrigation water from water harvesting were evaluated by an experimental soil column study. A pilot water harvesting agrisystem on the Black Mesa in northeastern Arizona was the source of data and soil materials used in the study. A salt leaching simulation model provided predictions for comparison to the experimental results. In general, Na, Ca, and Mg were all easily leached from both soil materials, with higher concentrations yielded from the minespoil. When sodium was applied in solution, the minespoil accumulated 20% of the amount applied in the upper 10 cm of the soil column, while the natural soil retained 50% in the upper 25 cm. In addition, the natural soil retained 60% of the Ca applied in solution. The simulation model produced good results for Na but only fair prediction of Ca and Mg. A discussion of the experimental conclusions' applicability to field conditions, the difficulties of the salt leaching model, and recommendations for further research is given.
Keywords:
Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleWater Harvesting: Soil/Water Impacts of Salt Treatmenten_US
dc.contributor.authorTodd, Albert H.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUSDA, Tahoe National Forest, Nevada City, Californiaen_US
dc.date.issued1980-04-12-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe responses of mined -land and natural soil materials to additions of various salt solutions in irrigation water from water harvesting were evaluated by an experimental soil column study. A pilot water harvesting agrisystem on the Black Mesa in northeastern Arizona was the source of data and soil materials used in the study. A salt leaching simulation model provided predictions for comparison to the experimental results. In general, Na, Ca, and Mg were all easily leached from both soil materials, with higher concentrations yielded from the minespoil. When sodium was applied in solution, the minespoil accumulated 20% of the amount applied in the upper 10 cm of the soil column, while the natural soil retained 50% in the upper 25 cm. In addition, the natural soil retained 60% of the Ca applied in solution. The simulation model produced good results for Na but only fair prediction of Ca and Mg. A discussion of the experimental conclusions' applicability to field conditions, the difficulties of the salt leaching model, and recommendations for further research is given.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301203-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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