Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301168
Title:
The Impact of Socioeconomic Status on Residential Water Use: A Cross-Section Time-Series Analysis of Tucson, Arizona
Author:
Billings, R. Bruce; Acthe, Donald E.
Affiliation:
Department of Economics, University of Arizona; Department of Economics, St. Mary's University of San Antonio
Issue Date:
13-Apr-1979
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The impact of a selected set of socioeconomic variables on residential water consumption per household is examined using a combined cross-section time-series analysis by census tract for Tucson, Arizona for 1974, 1975, 1976 and 1977. The estimated income elasticity of demand for water is .23, which means that a 10-percent increase in income produces a 2.3 percent increase in water use. Additionally, the number of persons per household and the percent of households with head age 65 or more also are shown to have a strong positive relationship to water use. New residential units are shown to have a strong tendency to utilize less water than older units, presumable because of a shift away from water using yards. Both Black and Spanish-surnamed dominated areas tend to consume a lower than expected amount of water for their income and family size characteristics, but the coefficients on these variables are not sufficiently strong to accept this relationship.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe Impact of Socioeconomic Status on Residential Water Use: A Cross-Section Time-Series Analysis of Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBillings, R. Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.authorActhe, Donald E.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Economics, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Economics, St. Mary's University of San Antonioen_US
dc.date.issued1979-04-13-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe impact of a selected set of socioeconomic variables on residential water consumption per household is examined using a combined cross-section time-series analysis by census tract for Tucson, Arizona for 1974, 1975, 1976 and 1977. The estimated income elasticity of demand for water is .23, which means that a 10-percent increase in income produces a 2.3 percent increase in water use. Additionally, the number of persons per household and the percent of households with head age 65 or more also are shown to have a strong positive relationship to water use. New residential units are shown to have a strong tendency to utilize less water than older units, presumable because of a shift away from water using yards. Both Black and Spanish-surnamed dominated areas tend to consume a lower than expected amount of water for their income and family size characteristics, but the coefficients on these variables are not sufficiently strong to accept this relationship.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301168-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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