Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301165
Title:
Hydrologic Investigation of the Dry Lake Region in East Central Arizona
Author:
Lemmon, James J.; Schultz, Thomas R.; Young, Don W.
Affiliation:
Water Rights Division, Arizona State Land Department, Phoenix, Arizona
Issue Date:
13-Apr-1979
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The Dry Lake Region is located in Navajo County, Arizona, near the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau. The region's internal drainage basin of 160 mi2 is further augmented by 50 mi² of the Phoenix Park Wash drainage. The dominate surface water inflow to the playa is the 12 to 13 MGD of paper pulp mill effluent from Southwest Forest Industries near Snowflake, Arizona. As a result, the playa surface water is now covering several thousand acres. Dry Lake water quality is relatively poor by Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) drinking water standards. Ground water in the region is produced from the Coconino Aquifer which is comprised of the Coconino Sandstone and the Kaibab Limestone. The depth to ground water is 400 feet with a saturated zone 100-175 feet thick. Wells in the region yield from 0 to 500 gpm. The presence of the Holbrook Anticline and the Dry Lake Syncline influence both ground water flow direction and artesian conditions. There is concern that the playa may not be suited as an evaporative disposal basin because of the potential influence that karst topography and linear surface features may have on the water balance of the region.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHydrologic Investigation of the Dry Lake Region in East Central Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLemmon, James J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchultz, Thomas R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Don W.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Rights Division, Arizona State Land Department, Phoenix, Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1979-04-13-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe Dry Lake Region is located in Navajo County, Arizona, near the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau. The region's internal drainage basin of 160 mi2 is further augmented by 50 mi² of the Phoenix Park Wash drainage. The dominate surface water inflow to the playa is the 12 to 13 MGD of paper pulp mill effluent from Southwest Forest Industries near Snowflake, Arizona. As a result, the playa surface water is now covering several thousand acres. Dry Lake water quality is relatively poor by Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) drinking water standards. Ground water in the region is produced from the Coconino Aquifer which is comprised of the Coconino Sandstone and the Kaibab Limestone. The depth to ground water is 400 feet with a saturated zone 100-175 feet thick. Wells in the region yield from 0 to 500 gpm. The presence of the Holbrook Anticline and the Dry Lake Syncline influence both ground water flow direction and artesian conditions. There is concern that the playa may not be suited as an evaporative disposal basin because of the potential influence that karst topography and linear surface features may have on the water balance of the region.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301165-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.