Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301044
Title:
Salvaging Wasted Waters for Desert-Household Gardening
Author:
Fink, D. H.; Ehrler, W. L.
Affiliation:
U. S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Phoenix, Arizona 85040
Issue Date:
15-Apr-1978
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
With the objective of determining if sufficient water would be salvaged by a typical desert, urban-household from normally wasted sources associated with the lot and household to adequately irrigate a garden and orchard, a 2000 sq ft house on a typical one fifth acre lot in three cities having climates similar to Phoenix, Tucson, or Prescott, Arizona was hypothesized and the amount of water available for yard watering calculated, provided that (1) only rainfall was available, (2) rainfall-runoff from covered areas associated with or adjacent to the lot was salvaged (roof, street, alley etc.), (3) gray-water from the household was utilized, (4) a portion of the lot was waterproofed to concentrate the runoff on the untreated portion, and (5) various combinations of the above were utilized to increase the amount of available water. It is demonstrated that these sources could be used singly or in combination to obtain the required amount of water with the actual amount available depending upon the precipitation, runoff and runon areas, runoff efficiency of the contributing area, and the number of people in the household. A number of horticultural plants are suggested that should best fit such an irregular irrigation scheme.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Wastewater disposal; Water reuse; Reclaimed water; Water conservation; Rainfall-runoff relationships; Water harvesting; Surface runoff; Surface water availability; Water supply development; Water management (Applied); Water yield improvement; Runoff; Arid climates; Surface sealing; Irrigation techniques
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSalvaging Wasted Waters for Desert-Household Gardeningen_US
dc.contributor.authorFink, D. H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEhrler, W. L.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentU. S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Phoenix, Arizona 85040en_US
dc.date.issued1978-04-15-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractWith the objective of determining if sufficient water would be salvaged by a typical desert, urban-household from normally wasted sources associated with the lot and household to adequately irrigate a garden and orchard, a 2000 sq ft house on a typical one fifth acre lot in three cities having climates similar to Phoenix, Tucson, or Prescott, Arizona was hypothesized and the amount of water available for yard watering calculated, provided that (1) only rainfall was available, (2) rainfall-runoff from covered areas associated with or adjacent to the lot was salvaged (roof, street, alley etc.), (3) gray-water from the household was utilized, (4) a portion of the lot was waterproofed to concentrate the runoff on the untreated portion, and (5) various combinations of the above were utilized to increase the amount of available water. It is demonstrated that these sources could be used singly or in combination to obtain the required amount of water with the actual amount available depending upon the precipitation, runoff and runon areas, runoff efficiency of the contributing area, and the number of people in the household. A number of horticultural plants are suggested that should best fit such an irregular irrigation scheme.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWastewater disposalen_US
dc.subjectWater reuseen_US
dc.subjectReclaimed wateren_US
dc.subjectWater conservationen_US
dc.subjectRainfall-runoff relationshipsen_US
dc.subjectWater harvestingen_US
dc.subjectSurface runoffen_US
dc.subjectSurface water availabilityen_US
dc.subjectWater supply developmenten_US
dc.subjectWater management (Applied)en_US
dc.subjectWater yield improvementen_US
dc.subjectRunoffen_US
dc.subjectArid climatesen_US
dc.subjectSurface sealingen_US
dc.subjectIrrigation techniquesen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301044-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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