Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301041
Title:
Action Programs for Water Yield Improvement on Arizona's Watersheds: Political Constrains to Implementation
Author:
Cortner, H. J.; Berry, M. P.
Affiliation:
School of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Arizona; Department of Forestry, University of Wisconsin
Issue Date:
15-Apr-1978
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Although the Arizona Watershed Program 's (AWP) research efforts have had considerable success over the past 22 years in its objective to further knowledge of the feasibility of vegetative manipulation and modification as a method of increasing surface water yields, its principal sponsor and supporter, the Arizona Water Resources (AWRC), has not, to date, met with similar success. Described are three of the AWRC 's unsuccessful attempts to implement on-going action programs of vegetative management for water yield improvement: The Barr Report, the Ffolliott-Thorud Report, and the Globe Chaparral controversy, to illustrate how overstated program goals, unrealistic assumptions about the political feasibility of treatment types, extent, and intensity; failure to recognize the emergence of significant new decision-making participants, and unsettled questions concerning program costs and beneficiaries have contributed to setbacks in these programs. It is suggested that political as well as scientific constraints have accounted for reported failures in the implementation of the AWP action program objectives.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Project post-evaluation; Water yield improvement; Administrative agencies; Political constraints; Watershed management; Surface waters; Comprehensive planning; Economic efficiency; Decision making; Project planning; Arizona Water Resources Committee; Arizona Watershed Program; Evaluation; Vegetation effects
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAction Programs for Water Yield Improvement on Arizona's Watersheds: Political Constrains to Implementationen_US
dc.contributor.authorCortner, H. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBerry, M. P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Forestry, University of Wisconsinen_US
dc.date.issued1978-04-15-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough the Arizona Watershed Program 's (AWP) research efforts have had considerable success over the past 22 years in its objective to further knowledge of the feasibility of vegetative manipulation and modification as a method of increasing surface water yields, its principal sponsor and supporter, the Arizona Water Resources (AWRC), has not, to date, met with similar success. Described are three of the AWRC 's unsuccessful attempts to implement on-going action programs of vegetative management for water yield improvement: The Barr Report, the Ffolliott-Thorud Report, and the Globe Chaparral controversy, to illustrate how overstated program goals, unrealistic assumptions about the political feasibility of treatment types, extent, and intensity; failure to recognize the emergence of significant new decision-making participants, and unsettled questions concerning program costs and beneficiaries have contributed to setbacks in these programs. It is suggested that political as well as scientific constraints have accounted for reported failures in the implementation of the AWP action program objectives.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectProject post-evaluationen_US
dc.subjectWater yield improvementen_US
dc.subjectAdministrative agenciesen_US
dc.subjectPolitical constraintsen_US
dc.subjectWatershed managementen_US
dc.subjectSurface watersen_US
dc.subjectComprehensive planningen_US
dc.subjectEconomic efficiencyen_US
dc.subjectDecision makingen_US
dc.subjectProject planningen_US
dc.subjectArizona Water Resources Committeeen_US
dc.subjectArizona Watershed Programen_US
dc.subjectEvaluationen_US
dc.subjectVegetation effectsen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301041-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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