Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301039
Title:
Heavy Metals & Wastewater Reuse
Author:
Higgins, T. E.
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe
Issue Date:
15-Apr-1978
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Water shortages in the Western United States have intensified the search for new sources. Wastewater reuse is being increasingly called upon to augment existing supplies. One potential impediment to the continued expansion of wastewater reuse efforts is the accumulation of toxic heavy metals and other salts in the recycled water. Conventional and advanced wastewater treatment effect the removal of a portion of the heavy metals added during use. Removal is by chemical precipitation and adsorption and disposed of with the sludges. Potential uses of treated wastewater effluents include irrigation and groundwater recharge. Care must be taken to prevent contamination of groundwater, especially since existing wells have been reported to have concentrations of heavy metals in excess of drinking water standards. Percolation of wastewaters through soils (especially fine soils) results in a reduction in heavy metal concentrations. It is postulated that removal of these metals is by a combination of chemical precipitation with filtration of the precipitates, and adsorption on soil particles (thus the effectiveness of fine soils). Long term saturation of the soils with heavy metals may result in a "breakthrough" contamination of the groundwater. A predictive model of heavy metal-wastewater-soil interactions is proposed to aid in the design and regulation of wastewater reuse systems to eliminate or minimize this problem.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Heavy metals; Chemical wastes; Water pollution effects; Chemical properties; Water reuse; Water quality; Environmental effects; Chemical analysis; Waste water treatment; Groundwater recharge; Mathematical models
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHeavy Metals & Wastewater Reuseen_US
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, T. E.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempeen_US
dc.date.issued1978-04-15-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractWater shortages in the Western United States have intensified the search for new sources. Wastewater reuse is being increasingly called upon to augment existing supplies. One potential impediment to the continued expansion of wastewater reuse efforts is the accumulation of toxic heavy metals and other salts in the recycled water. Conventional and advanced wastewater treatment effect the removal of a portion of the heavy metals added during use. Removal is by chemical precipitation and adsorption and disposed of with the sludges. Potential uses of treated wastewater effluents include irrigation and groundwater recharge. Care must be taken to prevent contamination of groundwater, especially since existing wells have been reported to have concentrations of heavy metals in excess of drinking water standards. Percolation of wastewaters through soils (especially fine soils) results in a reduction in heavy metal concentrations. It is postulated that removal of these metals is by a combination of chemical precipitation with filtration of the precipitates, and adsorption on soil particles (thus the effectiveness of fine soils). Long term saturation of the soils with heavy metals may result in a "breakthrough" contamination of the groundwater. A predictive model of heavy metal-wastewater-soil interactions is proposed to aid in the design and regulation of wastewater reuse systems to eliminate or minimize this problem.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectHeavy metalsen_US
dc.subjectChemical wastesen_US
dc.subjectWater pollution effectsen_US
dc.subjectChemical propertiesen_US
dc.subjectWater reuseen_US
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental effectsen_US
dc.subjectChemical analysisen_US
dc.subjectWaste water treatmenten_US
dc.subjectGroundwater rechargeen_US
dc.subjectMathematical modelsen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301039-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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