Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301032
Title:
Analysis of Wastewater Land Treatment Systems in the Phoenix Urban Area
Author:
Ewing, R. L.
Affiliation:
Boyle Engineering Corporation, Phoenix Brance Office
Issue Date:
15-Apr-1978
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
As a part of the ongoing Phoenix Urban Study, Federal legislation mandates that land treatment of wastewater be seriously considered as a treatment option. Land treatment is a particularly viable alternative in the Phoenix area because in this arid desert climate, all water is a scarce and valuable resource and land treatment offers a positive opportunity for the conservation of this resource. In addition, land treatment systems are generally less expensive and have lower energy requirements than other conventional treatment processes while resulting in comparable treatment. The analysis of wastewater treatment systems for populated urban areas necessitates the preliminary investigation and comparison of a large number of alternatives to allow for a realistic engineering and economic evaluation. The site specific nature of land application adds additional variables that must be considered. A preliminary systems approach indicated that to minimize the effect of a human judgement factor between sites and yet maximize the depth of the initial analysis, computer techniques should be utilized for analysis and data storage. A summary of this analysis with appropriate cost, power usage, land requirements and other pertinent factors will be presented.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Waste water treatment; Environmental sanitation; On-site investigations; Sewage treatment; Alternate planning; Recycling; Water pollution treatment; Effluents; Computer programs; Economic feasibility; Phoenix; Arizona
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of Wastewater Land Treatment Systems in the Phoenix Urban Areaen_US
dc.contributor.authorEwing, R. L.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentBoyle Engineering Corporation, Phoenix Brance Officeen_US
dc.date.issued1978-04-15-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractAs a part of the ongoing Phoenix Urban Study, Federal legislation mandates that land treatment of wastewater be seriously considered as a treatment option. Land treatment is a particularly viable alternative in the Phoenix area because in this arid desert climate, all water is a scarce and valuable resource and land treatment offers a positive opportunity for the conservation of this resource. In addition, land treatment systems are generally less expensive and have lower energy requirements than other conventional treatment processes while resulting in comparable treatment. The analysis of wastewater treatment systems for populated urban areas necessitates the preliminary investigation and comparison of a large number of alternatives to allow for a realistic engineering and economic evaluation. The site specific nature of land application adds additional variables that must be considered. A preliminary systems approach indicated that to minimize the effect of a human judgement factor between sites and yet maximize the depth of the initial analysis, computer techniques should be utilized for analysis and data storage. A summary of this analysis with appropriate cost, power usage, land requirements and other pertinent factors will be presented.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWaste water treatmenten_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental sanitationen_US
dc.subjectOn-site investigationsen_US
dc.subjectSewage treatmenten_US
dc.subjectAlternate planningen_US
dc.subjectRecyclingen_US
dc.subjectWater pollution treatmenten_US
dc.subjectEffluentsen_US
dc.subjectComputer programsen_US
dc.subjectEconomic feasibilityen_US
dc.subjectPhoenixen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301032-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.