Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301031
Title:
Tucson's Tools for Demand Management
Author:
Davis, S. T.
Affiliation:
Water and Sewer Department, City of Tucson, Arizona
Issue Date:
15-Apr-1978
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Tucson's "Beat the Peak" program implemented in the summer of 1977 effectuated a reduction in peak day water usage from 151.5 million gallons per day on July 9, 1976, to 114.0 million gallons per day on July 8, 1977. This twenty-five percent reduction, if maintained, will allow a three -year deferral of a new remote wellfield and transmission pipeline estimated to cost between $25 and $50 million. More time will be available to analyze the cost effectiveness of solutions to the region's water resources supply problems (such as imported groundwater, Central Arizona Project water, effluent reuse, and their interrelationships). Although conservation was not promoted, the successful peak management program resulted in a 13.3 percent reduction in 1977 water use during the summer months (May through August) compared to usage during the same period in 1976. This resulted in water sales revenues less than projected, but the combination of less utility expenses and deferred capital improvements will yield lower customer rates and monthly bills than would have otherwise been necessary without the program.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Water demand; Project post-evaluation; Water allocation (Policy); Municipal water; Water management (Applied); Alternate planning; Capital costs; Comprehensive planning; Water consumption (Except consumptive use); Tucson; Arizona
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTucson's Tools for Demand Managementen_US
dc.contributor.authorDavis, S. T.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater and Sewer Department, City of Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1978-04-15-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractTucson's "Beat the Peak" program implemented in the summer of 1977 effectuated a reduction in peak day water usage from 151.5 million gallons per day on July 9, 1976, to 114.0 million gallons per day on July 8, 1977. This twenty-five percent reduction, if maintained, will allow a three -year deferral of a new remote wellfield and transmission pipeline estimated to cost between $25 and $50 million. More time will be available to analyze the cost effectiveness of solutions to the region's water resources supply problems (such as imported groundwater, Central Arizona Project water, effluent reuse, and their interrelationships). Although conservation was not promoted, the successful peak management program resulted in a 13.3 percent reduction in 1977 water use during the summer months (May through August) compared to usage during the same period in 1976. This resulted in water sales revenues less than projected, but the combination of less utility expenses and deferred capital improvements will yield lower customer rates and monthly bills than would have otherwise been necessary without the program.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater demanden_US
dc.subjectProject post-evaluationen_US
dc.subjectWater allocation (Policy)en_US
dc.subjectMunicipal wateren_US
dc.subjectWater management (Applied)en_US
dc.subjectAlternate planningen_US
dc.subjectCapital costsen_US
dc.subjectComprehensive planningen_US
dc.subjectWater consumption (Except consumptive use)en_US
dc.subjectTucsonen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301031-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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