Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301021
Title:
Distribution of Precipitation on Rugged Terrain in Central Arizona
Author:
Osborn, Herbert B.; David, Donald Ross
Affiliation:
USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forestry Sciences Laboratory, Tempe, Arizona
Issue Date:
16-Apr-1977
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
A 3-year study was conducted using tilted, vertical, directional, and recording rain gages (52 in all) to evaluate rainfall distribution on the Three Bar experimental watersheds in central Arizona. The tilted gages did not improve the determination of mean areal precipitation on the small watersheds because about as many tilted gages caught less rain as caught more. Although rugged and steep, the local topography exerted only minor effects on rainfall distribution compared to the major influence exerted by the Mazatzal Mountains to the windward (southwest). Forty-nine percent of wind travel was from the southwest quarter and wind averaged 4.4 mph when rain was actually falling. Wind exceeded 10 mph 9 percent of the time and 15 mph 0.4 percent of the time. Mean annual precipitation on the 600-acre study area ranged from 30 inches at 5,000 feet elevation to 22 inches at 3,400 feet (5 inches per 1,000 feet). Results of this study indicate that precipitation averages about 36 inches at 6,200 feet elevation along the Mazatzal crest near Four Peaks, about 6 inches more than published data show for the site.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDistribution of Precipitation on Rugged Terrain in Central Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorOsborn, Herbert B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDavid, Donald Rossen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUSDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forestry Sciences Laboratory, Tempe, Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1977-04-16-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractA 3-year study was conducted using tilted, vertical, directional, and recording rain gages (52 in all) to evaluate rainfall distribution on the Three Bar experimental watersheds in central Arizona. The tilted gages did not improve the determination of mean areal precipitation on the small watersheds because about as many tilted gages caught less rain as caught more. Although rugged and steep, the local topography exerted only minor effects on rainfall distribution compared to the major influence exerted by the Mazatzal Mountains to the windward (southwest). Forty-nine percent of wind travel was from the southwest quarter and wind averaged 4.4 mph when rain was actually falling. Wind exceeded 10 mph 9 percent of the time and 15 mph 0.4 percent of the time. Mean annual precipitation on the 600-acre study area ranged from 30 inches at 5,000 feet elevation to 22 inches at 3,400 feet (5 inches per 1,000 feet). Results of this study indicate that precipitation averages about 36 inches at 6,200 feet elevation along the Mazatzal crest near Four Peaks, about 6 inches more than published data show for the site.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301021-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.