Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301018
Title:
Influence of Forest Density on Bedload Movement in a Small Mountain Stream
Author:
Heede, Burchard H.
Affiliation:
USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forestry Sciences Laboratory, Tempe, Arizona
Issue Date:
16-Apr-1977
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
In contrast to three ephemeral streams in the vicinity, Tony Bear Creek, a small perennial stream in the White Mountains of Arizona, showed strong relationships among parameters of hydraulic geometry. Distances between gravel bars and log steps showed an inverse relationship with gradient (r² = 0.95). Shape factor and width-depth ratio increased upstream (r² = 0.98 and 0.90, respectively), indicating depth decrease toward the headwaters. The longitudinal profile is concave, and small, infrequent channel bars suggest that sediment movement is small. In contrast to the ephemeral streams, Tony Bear Creek is thus judged to be in dynamic equilibrium. Proportion of log steps to total steps (gravel bars plus logs) was much smaller in Tony Bear Creek (about 16 %) than in five other mountain streams (about 50 %). While all other streams ran through dense forests, only 60% of Tony Bear Creek was in forest, of which 13% had been selectively cut. Thus, forest density determined the proportion of logs incorporated into the stream hydraulic system, which in turn affects bedload movement.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleInfluence of Forest Density on Bedload Movement in a Small Mountain Streamen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeede, Burchard H.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUSDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forestry Sciences Laboratory, Tempe, Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1977-04-16-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractIn contrast to three ephemeral streams in the vicinity, Tony Bear Creek, a small perennial stream in the White Mountains of Arizona, showed strong relationships among parameters of hydraulic geometry. Distances between gravel bars and log steps showed an inverse relationship with gradient (r² = 0.95). Shape factor and width-depth ratio increased upstream (r² = 0.98 and 0.90, respectively), indicating depth decrease toward the headwaters. The longitudinal profile is concave, and small, infrequent channel bars suggest that sediment movement is small. In contrast to the ephemeral streams, Tony Bear Creek is thus judged to be in dynamic equilibrium. Proportion of log steps to total steps (gravel bars plus logs) was much smaller in Tony Bear Creek (about 16 %) than in five other mountain streams (about 50 %). While all other streams ran through dense forests, only 60% of Tony Bear Creek was in forest, of which 13% had been selectively cut. Thus, forest density determined the proportion of logs incorporated into the stream hydraulic system, which in turn affects bedload movement.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301018-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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