Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301016
Title:
Rehabilitation of Copper Mine Tailing Slopes Using Municipal Sewage Effluent
Author:
Verma, Tika R.; Ludeke, Kenneth L.; Day, A. D.
Affiliation:
School of Renewable Natural Resources, The University of Arizona, Tucson; Cyprus Pima Mining Company, Tucson; Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson
Issue Date:
16-Apr-1977
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The suitability of treated municipal sewage effluent for the irrigation of deep- rooting plant material for the rehabilitation of copper mine tailings was studied at the Cyprus Pima Mining Company. The effectiveness of treated sewage effluent was compared with well water on the growth and survival of trees, legumes and grasses. The species studied were eucalyptus (Eucalyptus rostrata), native mesquite (Prosopis juliflora), palo verde (Cercidium floridum), desert tobacco (Nicotiana lauca) barley (Hordeum vulgare), perennial rye grass (Lolium perenne), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), and blue lupine (Lupinus augustifolius). Sprinkler and tree -well irrigation methods were used to apply the treated sewage effluent and well water to steep tailing slopes. The treated municipal sewage effluent was found to be a practical irrigation substitute for well water and a good source of plant nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous. Effluent produced better survival and growth than did well water with or without augmentation.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Reclamation; Mine wastes; Revegetation; Sewage effluents; Arizona; Spoil banks; Desert plants; Mesquite; Alfalfa; Barley; Vegetation establishment; Irrigation effects
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRehabilitation of Copper Mine Tailing Slopes Using Municipal Sewage Effluenten_US
dc.contributor.authorVerma, Tika R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLudeke, Kenneth L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDay, A. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Renewable Natural Resources, The University of Arizona, Tucsonen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCyprus Pima Mining Company, Tucsonen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPlant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucsonen_US
dc.date.issued1977-04-16-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe suitability of treated municipal sewage effluent for the irrigation of deep- rooting plant material for the rehabilitation of copper mine tailings was studied at the Cyprus Pima Mining Company. The effectiveness of treated sewage effluent was compared with well water on the growth and survival of trees, legumes and grasses. The species studied were eucalyptus (Eucalyptus rostrata), native mesquite (Prosopis juliflora), palo verde (Cercidium floridum), desert tobacco (Nicotiana lauca) barley (Hordeum vulgare), perennial rye grass (Lolium perenne), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), and blue lupine (Lupinus augustifolius). Sprinkler and tree -well irrigation methods were used to apply the treated sewage effluent and well water to steep tailing slopes. The treated municipal sewage effluent was found to be a practical irrigation substitute for well water and a good source of plant nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous. Effluent produced better survival and growth than did well water with or without augmentation.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectReclamationen_US
dc.subjectMine wastesen_US
dc.subjectRevegetationen_US
dc.subjectSewage effluentsen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectSpoil banksen_US
dc.subjectDesert plantsen_US
dc.subjectMesquiteen_US
dc.subjectAlfalfaen_US
dc.subjectBarleyen_US
dc.subjectVegetation establishmenten_US
dc.subjectIrrigation effectsen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301016-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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