Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301004
Title:
Optimal Livestock Production of Rehabilitated Mine Lands
Author:
Brinck, Fritz H.; Fogel, Martin M.; Duckstein, Lucien
Affiliation:
Department of Systems and Industrial Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721; School of Renewable Natural Resources and Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721; Departments of Systems and Industrial Engineering and Hydrology & Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
Issue Date:
1-May-1976
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Strip mining leaves behind spoils to be recontoured to maximize the benefit of livestock production on the rehabilitated land. This paper designs watersheds to achieve a balance between two main range livestock requirements, forage and stock water by way of grading and furrowing man-made slopes. The three design attributes, surface configuration, surface treatment, and range management policy are optimized with respect to maximal profit accounting for natural uncertainties in 3 variables, viz., time interval between storm arrivals, precipitation per storm event, and duration of the storm event. Runoff and sedimentation are modeled on an event basis as functions of said random variables. The stock water reservoir at the bottom of the watershed is dredged periodically. The stochastic model is applied to the Black Mesa in Northern Arizona which is in the process of being strip-mined for coal.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleOptimal Livestock Production of Rehabilitated Mine Landsen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrinck, Fritz H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFogel, Martin M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDuckstein, Lucienen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Systems and Industrial Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Renewable Natural Resources and Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartments of Systems and Industrial Engineering and Hydrology & Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.date.issued1976-05-01-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractStrip mining leaves behind spoils to be recontoured to maximize the benefit of livestock production on the rehabilitated land. This paper designs watersheds to achieve a balance between two main range livestock requirements, forage and stock water by way of grading and furrowing man-made slopes. The three design attributes, surface configuration, surface treatment, and range management policy are optimized with respect to maximal profit accounting for natural uncertainties in 3 variables, viz., time interval between storm arrivals, precipitation per storm event, and duration of the storm event. Runoff and sedimentation are modeled on an event basis as functions of said random variables. The stock water reservoir at the bottom of the watershed is dredged periodically. The stochastic model is applied to the Black Mesa in Northern Arizona which is in the process of being strip-mined for coal.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301004-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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