Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301000
Title:
Nitrogen Removal from Secondary Effluent Applied to a Soil-Turf Filter
Author:
Anderson, E. L.; Pepper, I. L.; Johnson, G. V.
Affiliation:
Department of Soils, Water and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona; Soil Testing Laboratory, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater
Issue Date:
15-Apr-1978
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
This study investigated the potential of a soil-turf filter to renovate secondary effluent applied in excess of consumptive use. Lysimeter plots were filled with a sand and a sand mix, and seeded to winter ryegrass. In spring, plots were scalped and seeded to bermudagrass. Plots were drip irrigated twice a week with secondary effluent at rates of 10, 17, 22, 34, and 43 mm/day. Leachate and effluent were analyzed for NH -N, NO,-N, and organic-N. Grass clippings were oven dried, weighed, and analyzed for organic -N. Percent of leachate available for groundwater recharge was 50% at the lowest rate and 68% at the highest rate when values were averaged for both soils. The amount of nitrogen removed by the soil-turf filter using sand was 42 to 87% and 52 to 90% on the mix, decreasing as application rate increased. The highest nitrogen removal and utilization occurred at the lowest application rate. Turf utilization of nitrogen was 10 to 28% on sand and 18 to 36% on mix, decreasing as rate of application increased. The sand-turf filter renovated 22 mm/day and the mix-turf filter renovated 43 mm/day, yielding leachate averaging less than 10 ppm NO₃-N.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Turf grasses; Filters; Trickling filters; Waste water treatment; Water pollution treatment; Effluents; Nitrogen; Water pollution sources; Lysimeters; Drip irrigation; Sands; Leachate; Water quality
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleNitrogen Removal from Secondary Effluent Applied to a Soil-Turf Filteren_US
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, E. L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPepper, I. L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, G. V.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Soils, Water and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSoil Testing Laboratory, Oklahoma State University, Stillwateren_US
dc.date.issued1978-04-15-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the potential of a soil-turf filter to renovate secondary effluent applied in excess of consumptive use. Lysimeter plots were filled with a sand and a sand mix, and seeded to winter ryegrass. In spring, plots were scalped and seeded to bermudagrass. Plots were drip irrigated twice a week with secondary effluent at rates of 10, 17, 22, 34, and 43 mm/day. Leachate and effluent were analyzed for NH -N, NO,-N, and organic-N. Grass clippings were oven dried, weighed, and analyzed for organic -N. Percent of leachate available for groundwater recharge was 50% at the lowest rate and 68% at the highest rate when values were averaged for both soils. The amount of nitrogen removed by the soil-turf filter using sand was 42 to 87% and 52 to 90% on the mix, decreasing as application rate increased. The highest nitrogen removal and utilization occurred at the lowest application rate. Turf utilization of nitrogen was 10 to 28% on sand and 18 to 36% on mix, decreasing as rate of application increased. The sand-turf filter renovated 22 mm/day and the mix-turf filter renovated 43 mm/day, yielding leachate averaging less than 10 ppm NO₃-N.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectTurf grassesen_US
dc.subjectFiltersen_US
dc.subjectTrickling filtersen_US
dc.subjectWaste water treatmenten_US
dc.subjectWater pollution treatmenten_US
dc.subjectEffluentsen_US
dc.subjectNitrogenen_US
dc.subjectWater pollution sourcesen_US
dc.subjectLysimetersen_US
dc.subjectDrip irrigationen_US
dc.subjectSandsen_US
dc.subjectLeachateen_US
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301000-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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