Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300992
Title:
Transpiration and Photosynthesis in Saltcedar
Author:
Anderson, Jay E.
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID
Issue Date:
16-Apr-1977
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Factors controlling transpiration and photosynthesis of saltcedar were investigated in the field near Bernardo, New Mexico. Transpiration rates were similar to those for several herbaceous species, but photosynthesis and water use efficiency were significantly lower in saltcedar. Photosynthesis was light saturated at an irradiance equal to 44% of full sunlight, while the stomata were apparently fully open at light levels greater than one-third full sunlight. Optimum leaf temperatures for photosynthesis were between 23° and 28 °C, considerably lower than typical daytime ambient temperatures. Photosynthesis was reduced about 20% at 35 °C. Stomatal resistance increased linearly with increases in leaf temperature between 14° and 50 °C, with relative humidity held constant. The increase in stomatal resistance could have been caused by direct effects of temperature on the stomata, by increases in the absolute humidity gradient from leaf to air, or by both. Increased stomatal resistance at high temperatures and low relative humidities would account for observed afternoon depressions in transpiration and photosynthesis and increases in canopy resistance. Estimates of stomatal resistance for twigs in full sunlight ranged from 2 to 6 sec cm⁻¹, with most values falling between 3 and 5 sec cm-, when leaves were at 30 °C.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTranspiration and Photosynthesis in Saltcedaren_US
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Jay E.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biology, Idaho State University, Pocatello, IDen_US
dc.date.issued1977-04-16-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractFactors controlling transpiration and photosynthesis of saltcedar were investigated in the field near Bernardo, New Mexico. Transpiration rates were similar to those for several herbaceous species, but photosynthesis and water use efficiency were significantly lower in saltcedar. Photosynthesis was light saturated at an irradiance equal to 44% of full sunlight, while the stomata were apparently fully open at light levels greater than one-third full sunlight. Optimum leaf temperatures for photosynthesis were between 23° and 28 °C, considerably lower than typical daytime ambient temperatures. Photosynthesis was reduced about 20% at 35 °C. Stomatal resistance increased linearly with increases in leaf temperature between 14° and 50 °C, with relative humidity held constant. The increase in stomatal resistance could have been caused by direct effects of temperature on the stomata, by increases in the absolute humidity gradient from leaf to air, or by both. Increased stomatal resistance at high temperatures and low relative humidities would account for observed afternoon depressions in transpiration and photosynthesis and increases in canopy resistance. Estimates of stomatal resistance for twigs in full sunlight ranged from 2 to 6 sec cm⁻¹, with most values falling between 3 and 5 sec cm-, when leaves were at 30 °C.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300992-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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