Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300981
Title:
An Energy Budget Analysis of Evapotranspiration from Saltcedar
Author:
Gay, L. W.; Sammis, T. W.; Ben-Asher, J.
Affiliation:
School of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson; Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona, Tucson
Issue Date:
1-May-1976
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Energy budget evaluations of evapotranspiration from saltcedar were carried out on the flood plain of the Rio Grande River, near Bernardo, New Mexico. The site was adjacent to the Bureau of Reclamation's lysimeter study of water use by saltcedar. The energy budget for the cloudless day of June 14, 1975, revealed that energy gains from net radiation totaled 432 cal/cm² , while energy losses (in cal/cm2 ), were 14 to stored energy, 31 to convection, and 387 to evapotranspiration (ET). The energy loss to ET is equivalent to the latent energy contained in about 6.5 mm of water. The energy budget values are reasonable for a phreatophyte community in a semi-arid environment. The latent energy loss compares favorably with 401 cal/cm² measured by three lysimeters, although there were discrepancies in timing and amounts of loss among the individual lysimeters. The mean canopy diffusion resistance was 1.90 sec/cm over a 10-hour daytime period on June 14. The mean resistance was combined with vapor pressure deficit to predict lysimeter ET on three subsequent days. The agreement was within 12 percent, which suggests that diffusion resistance may be useful for simple ET predictions.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Evapotranspiration; Energy budget (Tamarisk); Tamarisk; Phreatophytes; Rio Grande River (N Mex); New Mexico; Semiarid climates; Lysimeters; Energy loss; Semi-arid lands
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn Energy Budget Analysis of Evapotranspiration from Saltcedaren_US
dc.contributor.authorGay, L. W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSammis, T. W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBen-Asher, J.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Arizona, Tucsonen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Research Center, University of Arizona, Tucsonen_US
dc.date.issued1976-05-01-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractEnergy budget evaluations of evapotranspiration from saltcedar were carried out on the flood plain of the Rio Grande River, near Bernardo, New Mexico. The site was adjacent to the Bureau of Reclamation's lysimeter study of water use by saltcedar. The energy budget for the cloudless day of June 14, 1975, revealed that energy gains from net radiation totaled 432 cal/cm² , while energy losses (in cal/cm2 ), were 14 to stored energy, 31 to convection, and 387 to evapotranspiration (ET). The energy loss to ET is equivalent to the latent energy contained in about 6.5 mm of water. The energy budget values are reasonable for a phreatophyte community in a semi-arid environment. The latent energy loss compares favorably with 401 cal/cm² measured by three lysimeters, although there were discrepancies in timing and amounts of loss among the individual lysimeters. The mean canopy diffusion resistance was 1.90 sec/cm over a 10-hour daytime period on June 14. The mean resistance was combined with vapor pressure deficit to predict lysimeter ET on three subsequent days. The agreement was within 12 percent, which suggests that diffusion resistance may be useful for simple ET predictions.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectEvapotranspirationen_US
dc.subjectEnergy budget (Tamarisk)en_US
dc.subjectTamarisken_US
dc.subjectPhreatophytesen_US
dc.subjectRio Grande River (N Mex)en_US
dc.subjectNew Mexicoen_US
dc.subjectSemiarid climatesen_US
dc.subjectLysimetersen_US
dc.subjectEnergy lossen_US
dc.subjectSemi-arid landsen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300981-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.