Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300977
Title:
Evaluation of Recharge Through Soils in a Mountain Region: A Case Study on the Empire and the Sonoita Basins
Author:
Kafri, U.; Ben-Asher, J.
Affiliation:
Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721
Issue Date:
1-May-1976
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
A conventional water balance method, employing long-term average values of rainfall, runoff and evapotranspiration yields near-zero recharge values for the Empire and the Sonoita basins. These results, however, are not in agreement with those obtained from an analysis of the local ground water regimes. A different approach for calculating recharge, based on the typical characteristics of these arid basins, is proposed. In particular, both basins are characterized by intense thunderstorms of short duration in the summer which occur usually towards the evening, and shallow, sandy-gravelly soils with a relatively high permeability overlying fractured rocks in the elevated mountain regions. These factors may cause a considerable amount of water to infiltrate through the soil profile, thereby escaping evapotranspiration during the following day. The proposed model deals with separate thunderstorm events using mean values of rainfall intensity and frequency corresponding to elevation. This model was coupled with a numerical solution of the flow equation which was used to solve the one dimensional water flow through a soil profile. The solution includes sink terms and was solved for the simultaneous processes of infiltration, moisture redistribution and evapotranspiration. The results obtained show almost no recharge in the low valleys, but significant recharge in the mountains. The amount of recharge increases with elevation and decreases with the depth of the soil profile.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEvaluation of Recharge Through Soils in a Mountain Region: A Case Study on the Empire and the Sonoita Basinsen_US
dc.contributor.authorKafri, U.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBen-Asher, J.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Research Center, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721en_US
dc.date.issued1976-05-01-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractA conventional water balance method, employing long-term average values of rainfall, runoff and evapotranspiration yields near-zero recharge values for the Empire and the Sonoita basins. These results, however, are not in agreement with those obtained from an analysis of the local ground water regimes. A different approach for calculating recharge, based on the typical characteristics of these arid basins, is proposed. In particular, both basins are characterized by intense thunderstorms of short duration in the summer which occur usually towards the evening, and shallow, sandy-gravelly soils with a relatively high permeability overlying fractured rocks in the elevated mountain regions. These factors may cause a considerable amount of water to infiltrate through the soil profile, thereby escaping evapotranspiration during the following day. The proposed model deals with separate thunderstorm events using mean values of rainfall intensity and frequency corresponding to elevation. This model was coupled with a numerical solution of the flow equation which was used to solve the one dimensional water flow through a soil profile. The solution includes sink terms and was solved for the simultaneous processes of infiltration, moisture redistribution and evapotranspiration. The results obtained show almost no recharge in the low valleys, but significant recharge in the mountains. The amount of recharge increases with elevation and decreases with the depth of the soil profile.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300977-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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