Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300975
Title:
Chlorofluorocarbons as Hydrologic Tracers, A New Technology
Author:
Randall, J. H.; Schultz, T. R.
Affiliation:
Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
Issue Date:
1-May-1976
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The nationwide research undertaken to study environmentally dispersed chlorofluorocarbons introduced into the atmosphere from aerosol cans and refrigeration systems has indicated that these compounds are potentially ideal hydrologic tracers, especially Freon-11 (Cl₃CF). The major advantages of Cl₃CF as a tracer are its non-polluting conservative nature, extremely low toxicity and sorptivity on clays, quantifiable build-up in the atmosphere, and a detection limit of about 10⁻¹⁴ grams. Quick and inexpensive detection of Cl₃CF can be done using a field-operable gas chromatograph with a pulsed electron-capture detector system. The presence of Cl₃CF in ground water, indicating an age of less than 30 years, will permit delineation of recent recharge areas. The absolute age of the recharging water is proportional to the atmospheric concentration of Cl₃CF at the time of recharge. The simple quantifiable increase of Cl₃CF in the atmosphere should therefore yield more accurate ages than those determined by tritium analysis.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Gas chromatography; Tracers; Chlorofluorocarbon; Air pollution; Atmosphere; Pollutant identification; Dating water
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleChlorofluorocarbons as Hydrologic Tracers, A New Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.authorRandall, J. H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchultz, T. R.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721en_US
dc.date.issued1976-05-01-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe nationwide research undertaken to study environmentally dispersed chlorofluorocarbons introduced into the atmosphere from aerosol cans and refrigeration systems has indicated that these compounds are potentially ideal hydrologic tracers, especially Freon-11 (Cl₃CF). The major advantages of Cl₃CF as a tracer are its non-polluting conservative nature, extremely low toxicity and sorptivity on clays, quantifiable build-up in the atmosphere, and a detection limit of about 10⁻¹⁴ grams. Quick and inexpensive detection of Cl₃CF can be done using a field-operable gas chromatograph with a pulsed electron-capture detector system. The presence of Cl₃CF in ground water, indicating an age of less than 30 years, will permit delineation of recent recharge areas. The absolute age of the recharging water is proportional to the atmospheric concentration of Cl₃CF at the time of recharge. The simple quantifiable increase of Cl₃CF in the atmosphere should therefore yield more accurate ages than those determined by tritium analysis.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectGas chromatographyen_US
dc.subjectTracersen_US
dc.subjectChlorofluorocarbonen_US
dc.subjectAir pollutionen_US
dc.subjectAtmosphereen_US
dc.subjectPollutant identificationen_US
dc.subjectDating wateren_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300975-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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