Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300962
Title:
Future Effects of the CAP on Lake Havasu's Thermal Regime
Affiliation:
Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
Issue Date:
1-May-1976
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
A temperature-stratification model developed by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, Hydrologic Engineering Center, was used to predict the changes in the temperature profile of Lake Havasu on the Colorado River near Parker, Arizona, that may occur with the withdrawal of Central Arizona Project (CAP) water in the 1980's. This quantified change in temperature-dependent density stratification was calculated using maximum withdrawal conditions to accentuate and expose any major changes which could be potential problems. Inputs for this program include monthly evaporation and precipitation, monthly average air temperature, solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere, water inflow amount and temperature, water outflow amount and location, water temperature profiles, and physical reservoir data. In the calibration of the model, the five coefficients were found to differ slightly from regional coefficients established by the Hydrologic Engineering Center, Davis, California, and coefficients established in a previous study. End of month temperature profiles were then generated for average meteorological conditions, both with and without maximum CAP flow. The computed results indicate that the stratification changes will be of low magnitude.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFuture Effects of the CAP on Lake Havasu's Thermal Regimeen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721en_US
dc.date.issued1976-05-01-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractA temperature-stratification model developed by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, Hydrologic Engineering Center, was used to predict the changes in the temperature profile of Lake Havasu on the Colorado River near Parker, Arizona, that may occur with the withdrawal of Central Arizona Project (CAP) water in the 1980's. This quantified change in temperature-dependent density stratification was calculated using maximum withdrawal conditions to accentuate and expose any major changes which could be potential problems. Inputs for this program include monthly evaporation and precipitation, monthly average air temperature, solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere, water inflow amount and temperature, water outflow amount and location, water temperature profiles, and physical reservoir data. In the calibration of the model, the five coefficients were found to differ slightly from regional coefficients established by the Hydrologic Engineering Center, Davis, California, and coefficients established in a previous study. End of month temperature profiles were then generated for average meteorological conditions, both with and without maximum CAP flow. The computed results indicate that the stratification changes will be of low magnitude.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300962-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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