Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300458
Title:
Hydrologic Aspects of Land-Use Planning at Tumamoc Hill, Tucson, Arizona
Author:
Popkin, Barney Paul
Affiliation:
Soils, Water and Engineering Department, The University of Arizona, Tucson
Issue Date:
20-Apr-1974
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Tumamoc Hill, an 869-acre (352 ha) desert area near Tucson, Arizona, is being considered as a controlled- access environmental site. Water affects the site's geology, soils, vegetation, wildlife, and archaeology. The Hill is drained by three small watersheds. The largest is rapidly urbanizing upstream. Hydrologic aspects include potential flooding and erosion hazards. These may be reduced simply, economically, and wisely in a land-use plan. Upstream development increases storm runoff volumes, and flood peaks, and frequencies routed through the site, and threatens existing downstream urban development. Return periods of channel-overflow floods become shorter with urbanization. The region may be managed to reduce hydrologic hazards by three procedures: widen channels, install low checkdams, and vegetate drainageways. These methods will slow down runoff velocities, and increase cross -sectional area of flow and roughness coefficient. More water would also be available for vegetation and wildlife. The land-use plan should include environmental education programs. These would present important effects of water on the natural ecology, and hydrologic aspects of watershed urbanization.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Hydrologic aspects; Land management; Small watersheds; Flood protection; Urbanization; Arizona; Land use; Topography; Land development; Planning; Soils; Vegetation; Hydrologic data; Geology; Wildlife; Archaeology; Floods; Channel improvement; Dams; Vegetation establishment; Erosion control; Tumamoc Hill (Tucson Ariz); Land use planning
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHydrologic Aspects of Land-Use Planning at Tumamoc Hill, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPopkin, Barney Paulen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSoils, Water and Engineering Department, The University of Arizona, Tucsonen_US
dc.date.issued1974-04-20-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractTumamoc Hill, an 869-acre (352 ha) desert area near Tucson, Arizona, is being considered as a controlled- access environmental site. Water affects the site's geology, soils, vegetation, wildlife, and archaeology. The Hill is drained by three small watersheds. The largest is rapidly urbanizing upstream. Hydrologic aspects include potential flooding and erosion hazards. These may be reduced simply, economically, and wisely in a land-use plan. Upstream development increases storm runoff volumes, and flood peaks, and frequencies routed through the site, and threatens existing downstream urban development. Return periods of channel-overflow floods become shorter with urbanization. The region may be managed to reduce hydrologic hazards by three procedures: widen channels, install low checkdams, and vegetate drainageways. These methods will slow down runoff velocities, and increase cross -sectional area of flow and roughness coefficient. More water would also be available for vegetation and wildlife. The land-use plan should include environmental education programs. These would present important effects of water on the natural ecology, and hydrologic aspects of watershed urbanization.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectHydrologic aspectsen_US
dc.subjectLand managementen_US
dc.subjectSmall watershedsen_US
dc.subjectFlood protectionen_US
dc.subjectUrbanizationen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectLand useen_US
dc.subjectTopographyen_US
dc.subjectLand developmenten_US
dc.subjectPlanningen_US
dc.subjectSoilsen_US
dc.subjectVegetationen_US
dc.subjectHydrologic dataen_US
dc.subjectGeologyen_US
dc.subjectWildlifeen_US
dc.subjectArchaeologyen_US
dc.subjectFloodsen_US
dc.subjectChannel improvementen_US
dc.subjectDamsen_US
dc.subjectVegetation establishmenten_US
dc.subjectErosion controlen_US
dc.subjectTumamoc Hill (Tucson Ariz)en_US
dc.subjectLand use planningen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300458-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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