Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300455
Title:
Water Resource Alternatives for Power Generation in Arizona
Author:
Smith, Stephen E.; DeCook, K. James; Fazzolare, Rocco A.
Affiliation:
Nuclear Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona, Tucson
Issue Date:
20-Apr-1974
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
An examination of potential water sources for power plant cooling in Arizona is presented along with information pertinent to Arizona's future water needs relative to electrical usage growth. It has been projected that Arizona's peak electrical power demands in 1980 and 1990 will exceed that of 1970 by some 5000 megawatts and 16000 megawatts of electricity respectively. At present, the bulk of the electrical energy generated in the western states originates at hydroelectric installations. Utilization of nuclear reactors for power generation requires a larger amount of cooling water than is required for a comparable fossil-fueled plant. It is suggested that the utilization of reclaimed wastewater for cooling purposes is a viable and attractive alternative to groundwater pumpage from both economic and ecological standpoints. Savings arise from conservation of fuel normally required for well pumps, costs of well construction are not required, quantities of fresh water should be released for consumption by alternate users, and a previously unused resource would be effectively recycled.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Water reuse; Water conservation; Electric power production; Nuclear powerplants; Cooling water; Water sources; Arizona; Water resources; Water management (applied); Water supply; Water utilization; Water requirements; Hydroelectric power; Electric power; Efficiencies; Electric power demand; Industrial water; Potential water supply
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleWater Resource Alternatives for Power Generation in Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Stephen E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDeCook, K. Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorFazzolare, Rocco A.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentNuclear Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucsonen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Research Center, University of Arizona, Tucsonen_US
dc.date.issued1974-04-20-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractAn examination of potential water sources for power plant cooling in Arizona is presented along with information pertinent to Arizona's future water needs relative to electrical usage growth. It has been projected that Arizona's peak electrical power demands in 1980 and 1990 will exceed that of 1970 by some 5000 megawatts and 16000 megawatts of electricity respectively. At present, the bulk of the electrical energy generated in the western states originates at hydroelectric installations. Utilization of nuclear reactors for power generation requires a larger amount of cooling water than is required for a comparable fossil-fueled plant. It is suggested that the utilization of reclaimed wastewater for cooling purposes is a viable and attractive alternative to groundwater pumpage from both economic and ecological standpoints. Savings arise from conservation of fuel normally required for well pumps, costs of well construction are not required, quantities of fresh water should be released for consumption by alternate users, and a previously unused resource would be effectively recycled.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater reuseen_US
dc.subjectWater conservationen_US
dc.subjectElectric power productionen_US
dc.subjectNuclear powerplantsen_US
dc.subjectCooling wateren_US
dc.subjectWater sourcesen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectWater resourcesen_US
dc.subjectWater management (applied)en_US
dc.subjectWater supplyen_US
dc.subjectWater utilizationen_US
dc.subjectWater requirementsen_US
dc.subjectHydroelectric poweren_US
dc.subjectElectric poweren_US
dc.subjectEfficienciesen_US
dc.subjectElectric power demanden_US
dc.subjectIndustrial wateren_US
dc.subjectPotential water supplyen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300455-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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