Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300420
Title:
Structural Relations Determined from Interpretation of Geophysical Surveys: Woody Mountain Well Field, Coconino County, Arizona
Author:
Scott, Phyllis K.; Montgomery, E. L.
Affiliation:
Northern Arizona University
Issue Date:
20-Apr-1974
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The Coconino Sandstone of Permian age is the principal aquifer for the Woody Mountain well field, a source of municipal water for the City of Flagstaff. Wells of highest yield are located where the frequency of occurrence of faults is greatest and where the principal aquifer is down-faulted. The locations and displacements of all but the most prominent faults cannot be determined using conventional geologic mapping techniques because relatively undeformed Late Cenozoic basaltic lavas cover the faulted Paleozoic rock terrain. Approximately 3,500 feet of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, which have little magnetic effect and which have a density of approximately 2.4, comprise most of the stratigraphic section in the well field. The basalt cover is strongly reversely magnetized and has a density of approximately 2.7. Changes in thickness of the basalt cover cause changes in the geomagnetic and gravitational field strength. Analysis of data from geomagnetic and gravity surveys was used to delineate boundaries and thicknesses of blocks of basalt which fill down -faulted areas. The correlation coefficient (r² = 0.96) for plots of known thicknesses of basalt versus complete Bouguer anomaly supports use of gravity data to estimate displacement of down -faulted blocks.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Water resources; Groundwater basins; Faults (geologic); Water wells; Geophysics; Arizona; Groundwater; Aquifers; Water supply; Aquifer characteristics; Water storage; Groundwater mining; Water sources; Water yield; Hydrogeology; Gravity studies; Magnetic studies; Gravimetric analysis; Sandstones; Municipal water; Flagstaff (Ariz); Woody Mountain well field (Ariz)
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleStructural Relations Determined from Interpretation of Geophysical Surveys: Woody Mountain Well Field, Coconino County, Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorScott, Phyllis K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMontgomery, E. L.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentNorthern Arizona Universityen_US
dc.date.issued1974-04-20-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe Coconino Sandstone of Permian age is the principal aquifer for the Woody Mountain well field, a source of municipal water for the City of Flagstaff. Wells of highest yield are located where the frequency of occurrence of faults is greatest and where the principal aquifer is down-faulted. The locations and displacements of all but the most prominent faults cannot be determined using conventional geologic mapping techniques because relatively undeformed Late Cenozoic basaltic lavas cover the faulted Paleozoic rock terrain. Approximately 3,500 feet of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, which have little magnetic effect and which have a density of approximately 2.4, comprise most of the stratigraphic section in the well field. The basalt cover is strongly reversely magnetized and has a density of approximately 2.7. Changes in thickness of the basalt cover cause changes in the geomagnetic and gravitational field strength. Analysis of data from geomagnetic and gravity surveys was used to delineate boundaries and thicknesses of blocks of basalt which fill down -faulted areas. The correlation coefficient (r² = 0.96) for plots of known thicknesses of basalt versus complete Bouguer anomaly supports use of gravity data to estimate displacement of down -faulted blocks.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resourcesen_US
dc.subjectGroundwater basinsen_US
dc.subjectFaults (geologic)en_US
dc.subjectWater wellsen_US
dc.subjectGeophysicsen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectGroundwateren_US
dc.subjectAquifersen_US
dc.subjectWater supplyen_US
dc.subjectAquifer characteristicsen_US
dc.subjectWater storageen_US
dc.subjectGroundwater miningen_US
dc.subjectWater sourcesen_US
dc.subjectWater yielden_US
dc.subjectHydrogeologyen_US
dc.subjectGravity studiesen_US
dc.subjectMagnetic studiesen_US
dc.subjectGravimetric analysisen_US
dc.subjectSandstonesen_US
dc.subjectMunicipal wateren_US
dc.subjectFlagstaff (Ariz)en_US
dc.subjectWoody Mountain well field (Ariz)en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300420-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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