Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300351
Title:
The Effect of Development on Groundwater in the Parker Strip
Author:
Everett, L. G.; Schultz, T. R.
Affiliation:
Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
Issue Date:
20-Apr-1974
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The 14.6 miles of the Colorado River bounded by Parker Dam and Headgate Rock Dam has been referred to as the Parker Strip. This river reach has become a high use recreation area during the past decade with 4,000 permanent residents and as many as 120,000 water enthusiasts on long weekends. The riparian area of the river is heavily clustered with mobile homes, marinas and public beaches. The means of sewage disposal is exclusively via septic tanks. Recent surveys by the Environmental Protection Agency, Arizona State Department of Public Health and the University of Arizona have localized surface water bacteria levels that may indicate a developing groundwater problem. The geohydrology of the area indicates that the septic tanks are located in Post -Pliocene Colorado River deposits. The deposits are quite thin and relatively narrow. Since the deposits are locally derived sands and gravels, the horizontal hydraulic conductivities are such that a relatively short flow time to the river may result. Intensive evaluation of the degradation of the water quality in these deposits is needed to determine if the ground water supply was jeopardized by septic tank systems.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Water quality; Colorado River; Septic tanks; Groundwater movement; Water pollution; Recreation facilities; Arizona; California; Water quality standards; Public health; Water pollution; Water analysis; Water pollution sources; Water quality control; Water chemistry; Sewage disposal; Domestic wastes; Permeability; Recreation; Recreation wastes; Parker strip
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe Effect of Development on Groundwater in the Parker Stripen_US
dc.contributor.authorEverett, L. G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchultz, T. R.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1974-04-20-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe 14.6 miles of the Colorado River bounded by Parker Dam and Headgate Rock Dam has been referred to as the Parker Strip. This river reach has become a high use recreation area during the past decade with 4,000 permanent residents and as many as 120,000 water enthusiasts on long weekends. The riparian area of the river is heavily clustered with mobile homes, marinas and public beaches. The means of sewage disposal is exclusively via septic tanks. Recent surveys by the Environmental Protection Agency, Arizona State Department of Public Health and the University of Arizona have localized surface water bacteria levels that may indicate a developing groundwater problem. The geohydrology of the area indicates that the septic tanks are located in Post -Pliocene Colorado River deposits. The deposits are quite thin and relatively narrow. Since the deposits are locally derived sands and gravels, the horizontal hydraulic conductivities are such that a relatively short flow time to the river may result. Intensive evaluation of the degradation of the water quality in these deposits is needed to determine if the ground water supply was jeopardized by septic tank systems.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.subjectColorado Riveren_US
dc.subjectSeptic tanksen_US
dc.subjectGroundwater movementen_US
dc.subjectWater pollutionen_US
dc.subjectRecreation facilitiesen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectCaliforniaen_US
dc.subjectWater quality standardsen_US
dc.subjectPublic healthen_US
dc.subjectWater pollutionen_US
dc.subjectWater analysisen_US
dc.subjectWater pollution sourcesen_US
dc.subjectWater quality controlen_US
dc.subjectWater chemistryen_US
dc.subjectSewage disposalen_US
dc.subjectDomestic wastesen_US
dc.subjectPermeabilityen_US
dc.subjectRecreationen_US
dc.subjectRecreation wastesen_US
dc.subjectParker stripen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300351-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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