Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300339
Title:
Fresh Water for Arizona by Salt Replacement Desalination
Author:
Muller, Anthony B.
Affiliation:
Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
Issue Date:
20-Apr-1974
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The process of salt replacement desalination proposed is believed to be able to produce vast quantities of fresh water be desalination. This method, which is a novel approach to minimizing the costs of saline water conversion, consists of the substitution of solutes in a solution to be desalted by a replacer chemical, and the low energy removal of that replacer chemical. The ultrafiltration of larger molecular sized replacer chemicals with high flux membranes increases the produce yield rate and reduces the corresponding energy requirement, with respect to reverse osmosis. In addition, the initial captial investment is less since no pressure constraining devices are required. The alteration of the osmotic pressure of the replacer solution within the process can also take advantage of energy savings through the utilization of an easily reversible reaction which synthesizes and breaks down a constituent that has a significant osmotic pressure difference between phases. Finally, the unusual process of fixed gel syneresis shows potential as a low energy salt replacement type process, but still requires extensive investigation.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Desalination; Water chemistry; Desalination processes; Membrane processes; Reverse osmosis; Arizona; Water treatment; Water purification; Desalination plants; Costs; Saline water; Water supply; Cost comparisons; Solvent extractions; Water yield; Salt replacement desalination; Replacer chemical; Ultrafiltration; High flux membranes; Energy requirements; Fixed gel syneresis
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFresh Water for Arizona by Salt Replacement Desalinationen_US
dc.contributor.authorMuller, Anthony B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721en_US
dc.date.issued1974-04-20-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe process of salt replacement desalination proposed is believed to be able to produce vast quantities of fresh water be desalination. This method, which is a novel approach to minimizing the costs of saline water conversion, consists of the substitution of solutes in a solution to be desalted by a replacer chemical, and the low energy removal of that replacer chemical. The ultrafiltration of larger molecular sized replacer chemicals with high flux membranes increases the produce yield rate and reduces the corresponding energy requirement, with respect to reverse osmosis. In addition, the initial captial investment is less since no pressure constraining devices are required. The alteration of the osmotic pressure of the replacer solution within the process can also take advantage of energy savings through the utilization of an easily reversible reaction which synthesizes and breaks down a constituent that has a significant osmotic pressure difference between phases. Finally, the unusual process of fixed gel syneresis shows potential as a low energy salt replacement type process, but still requires extensive investigation.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectDesalinationen_US
dc.subjectWater chemistryen_US
dc.subjectDesalination processesen_US
dc.subjectMembrane processesen_US
dc.subjectReverse osmosisen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectWater treatmenten_US
dc.subjectWater purificationen_US
dc.subjectDesalination plantsen_US
dc.subjectCostsen_US
dc.subjectSaline wateren_US
dc.subjectWater supplyen_US
dc.subjectCost comparisonsen_US
dc.subjectSolvent extractionsen_US
dc.subjectWater yielden_US
dc.subjectSalt replacement desalinationen_US
dc.subjectReplacer chemicalen_US
dc.subjectUltrafiltrationen_US
dc.subjectHigh flux membranesen_US
dc.subjectEnergy requirementsen_US
dc.subjectFixed gel syneresisen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300339-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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