Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300329
Title:
Assessing Soil-Water Status Via Albedo Measurement
Author:
Idso, Sherwood B.; Reginato, Robert J.
Affiliation:
ARS, USDA, U. S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Phoenix, Arizona 85040
Issue Date:
20-Apr-1974
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Reliable information on soil-water status is required in order to make accurate water balance studies of watersheds, to determine the survival probabilities of various types of vegetation between rainfalls in low rainfall areas, and to determine the susceptibility of the uppermost soil to wind erosion. Simple solarimeters may help to accomplish this objective. Bare soil albedo was a linear function of the water content of a very thin surface layer of soil, and albedo correlated well with water contents of thicker soil layers. In addition, albedo measurements could be used to delineate the 3 classical stages of soil drying. Albedo may also be used to differentiate between the initial potential rate phase of evaporation following an application of water, and the succeeding falling rate phase. Results of applying this technique to a field of Avondale clay loam indicate that 20% to 25% of the water applied by either irrigation or rain will be lost by stage 1 potential evaporation, independent of seasonal variations in evaporative demand. Presently the techniques developed are applicable only to bare soil surfaces.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Soil moisture; Albedo; Moisture content; Soil surfaces; Evaporation; Topsoil; Water balance; Water loss; Radiation; Soil physical properties; Soil water movement; Drying; Air-earth interfaces; Clay loam; Vegetation effects; Irrigation; Rainfall; Bare soil albedo; Solarimeters; Soil drying
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAssessing Soil-Water Status Via Albedo Measurementen_US
dc.contributor.authorIdso, Sherwood B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorReginato, Robert J.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentARS, USDA, U. S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Phoenix, Arizona 85040en_US
dc.date.issued1974-04-20-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractReliable information on soil-water status is required in order to make accurate water balance studies of watersheds, to determine the survival probabilities of various types of vegetation between rainfalls in low rainfall areas, and to determine the susceptibility of the uppermost soil to wind erosion. Simple solarimeters may help to accomplish this objective. Bare soil albedo was a linear function of the water content of a very thin surface layer of soil, and albedo correlated well with water contents of thicker soil layers. In addition, albedo measurements could be used to delineate the 3 classical stages of soil drying. Albedo may also be used to differentiate between the initial potential rate phase of evaporation following an application of water, and the succeeding falling rate phase. Results of applying this technique to a field of Avondale clay loam indicate that 20% to 25% of the water applied by either irrigation or rain will be lost by stage 1 potential evaporation, independent of seasonal variations in evaporative demand. Presently the techniques developed are applicable only to bare soil surfaces.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectSoil moistureen_US
dc.subjectAlbedoen_US
dc.subjectMoisture contenten_US
dc.subjectSoil surfacesen_US
dc.subjectEvaporationen_US
dc.subjectTopsoilen_US
dc.subjectWater balanceen_US
dc.subjectWater lossen_US
dc.subjectRadiationen_US
dc.subjectSoil physical propertiesen_US
dc.subjectSoil water movementen_US
dc.subjectDryingen_US
dc.subjectAir-earth interfacesen_US
dc.subjectClay loamen_US
dc.subjectVegetation effectsen_US
dc.subjectIrrigationen_US
dc.subjectRainfallen_US
dc.subjectBare soil albedoen_US
dc.subjectSolarimetersen_US
dc.subjectSoil dryingen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300329-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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