Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300297
Title:
Salinity Problems of the Safford Valley: An Interdisciplinary Analysis
Author:
Muller, Anthony B.
Affiliation:
Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson
Issue Date:
5-May-1973
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
A change in groundwater quality, averaging approximately +0.13 millimhos electrical conductivity and +35 ppm chloride per year, has been documented between 1940 and 1972 with data from ten long -term sample wells. The decrement in the water quality of the surficial aquifer seems to be attributable to four major mechanisms. An increase in salinity may be expected from leakage of saline water from the artesian aquifer. Such leakage would be stimulated by pumping- caused reduction of confining pressure, and by the puncture of the cap beds by deep wells. Water reaching the aquifer from natural recharge may contribute salts to the system. Such recharging water, if passed through soluble beds, could contribute to the salt. Lateral movement of water through similar deposits may be a contribution, and the concentration and infiltration of agricultural water could also add to aquifer salinity. The economic analysis of the Safford Valley, based on the modeling of a "Representative Farm" analog, indicates that cotton will remain economical to produce on the basis of the projected salinity trends, for a significant time beyond limits of prediction. The analysis indicates that the optimum salt-resistant crops for the area are being cultivated, and, of these, alfalfa will cease to be productive in large areas of the valley by 1990. The entire valley will not produce alfalfa for profit by 2040. The methodologies shown in the paper indicate how pumping influences salinity change and outline salinity control recommendations for the area.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Salinity; Water quality; Leakage; Agricultural runoff; Crop production; Arizona; Cotton; Alfalfa; Aquifer systems; Artesian aquifers; Deep wells; Salts; Salt tolerance; Water pollution sources; Irrigation water; Water quality control; Safford Valley (Ariz)
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSalinity Problems of the Safford Valley: An Interdisciplinary Analysisen_US
dc.contributor.authorMuller, Anthony B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucsonen_US
dc.date.issued1973-05-05-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractA change in groundwater quality, averaging approximately +0.13 millimhos electrical conductivity and +35 ppm chloride per year, has been documented between 1940 and 1972 with data from ten long -term sample wells. The decrement in the water quality of the surficial aquifer seems to be attributable to four major mechanisms. An increase in salinity may be expected from leakage of saline water from the artesian aquifer. Such leakage would be stimulated by pumping- caused reduction of confining pressure, and by the puncture of the cap beds by deep wells. Water reaching the aquifer from natural recharge may contribute salts to the system. Such recharging water, if passed through soluble beds, could contribute to the salt. Lateral movement of water through similar deposits may be a contribution, and the concentration and infiltration of agricultural water could also add to aquifer salinity. The economic analysis of the Safford Valley, based on the modeling of a "Representative Farm" analog, indicates that cotton will remain economical to produce on the basis of the projected salinity trends, for a significant time beyond limits of prediction. The analysis indicates that the optimum salt-resistant crops for the area are being cultivated, and, of these, alfalfa will cease to be productive in large areas of the valley by 1990. The entire valley will not produce alfalfa for profit by 2040. The methodologies shown in the paper indicate how pumping influences salinity change and outline salinity control recommendations for the area.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectSalinityen_US
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.subjectLeakageen_US
dc.subjectAgricultural runoffen_US
dc.subjectCrop productionen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectCottonen_US
dc.subjectAlfalfaen_US
dc.subjectAquifer systemsen_US
dc.subjectArtesian aquifersen_US
dc.subjectDeep wellsen_US
dc.subjectSaltsen_US
dc.subjectSalt toleranceen_US
dc.subjectWater pollution sourcesen_US
dc.subjectIrrigation wateren_US
dc.subjectWater quality controlen_US
dc.subjectSafford Valley (Ariz)en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300297-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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