Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300288
Title:
Penetrability and Hydraulic Conductivity of Dilute Sulfuric Acid Solutions in Selected Arizona Soils
Author:
Miyamoto, S.; Ryan, J.; Bohn, H. L.
Affiliation:
Department of Soils, Water and Engineering, College of Agriculture, The University of Arizona, Tucson 85721
Issue Date:
5-May-1973
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Measurements of penetrability and hydraulic conductivity in calcareous soils treated with a dilute sulfuric acid solution showed a severe decrease in conductivity with increasing concentrations over 1000 ppm. A slight decrease in penetrability was observed. Carbon dioxide evolution appeared to be responsible for flow reduction and temporary cessation at 10,000 ppm and 20,000 ppm. In sodic soils penetrability and conductivity increased markedly with sulfuric acid concentrations between 1,000 and 10,000 ppm. For a neutral soil, penetrability decreased with increasing sulfuric acid concentrations, and the stable conductivity for 500 to 5,000 ppm was higher than for water alone. The findings suggest that disposal of sulfuric acid concentrations greater than 1,000 ppm will result in plugging by carbon dioxide. In sodic soils the possibility exists of using sulfuric acid solutions for reclaiming salt and sodium-affected soils.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Hydraulic conductivity; Penetration; Calcareous soils; Sodium; Sulfur; Sulfides; Acids; Acid mine water; Soils; Carbonates; Neutralization; Salts; Carbon dioxide; Arizona; Alkali soils; Sulfuric acid; Saturation point
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePenetrability and Hydraulic Conductivity of Dilute Sulfuric Acid Solutions in Selected Arizona Soilsen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiyamoto, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRyan, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBohn, H. L.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Soils, Water and Engineering, College of Agriculture, The University of Arizona, Tucson 85721en_US
dc.date.issued1973-05-05-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractMeasurements of penetrability and hydraulic conductivity in calcareous soils treated with a dilute sulfuric acid solution showed a severe decrease in conductivity with increasing concentrations over 1000 ppm. A slight decrease in penetrability was observed. Carbon dioxide evolution appeared to be responsible for flow reduction and temporary cessation at 10,000 ppm and 20,000 ppm. In sodic soils penetrability and conductivity increased markedly with sulfuric acid concentrations between 1,000 and 10,000 ppm. For a neutral soil, penetrability decreased with increasing sulfuric acid concentrations, and the stable conductivity for 500 to 5,000 ppm was higher than for water alone. The findings suggest that disposal of sulfuric acid concentrations greater than 1,000 ppm will result in plugging by carbon dioxide. In sodic soils the possibility exists of using sulfuric acid solutions for reclaiming salt and sodium-affected soils.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectHydraulic conductivityen_US
dc.subjectPenetrationen_US
dc.subjectCalcareous soilsen_US
dc.subjectSodiumen_US
dc.subjectSulfuren_US
dc.subjectSulfidesen_US
dc.subjectAcidsen_US
dc.subjectAcid mine wateren_US
dc.subjectSoilsen_US
dc.subjectCarbonatesen_US
dc.subjectNeutralizationen_US
dc.subjectSaltsen_US
dc.subjectCarbon dioxideen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectAlkali soilsen_US
dc.subjectSulfuric aciden_US
dc.subjectSaturation pointen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300288-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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