Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300285
Title:
Groundwater Recharge from a Portion of the Santa Catalina Mountains
Author:
Belan, R. A.; Matlock, W. G.
Affiliation:
Soils, Water and Engineering Department, The University of Arizona, Tucson
Issue Date:
5-May-1973
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The geohydrology of a portion of the Santa Catalina Mountains including the definition of aquifer systems in the foothills was studied in order to calculate groundwater recharge to the Tucson basin. This underlying groundwater aquifer is the only source of Tucson, Arizona's water supply. A well network, well logs, geologic profiles, and a water level contour map were used as source information. Recharge was found to occur in some sections of washes and close to the mountains where washes cross or coincide with faults. Significant recharge to sand and gravel aquifers occurs directly through faults and joints. Little of the surface runoff is thought to recharge local aquifers because of low permeability layers beneath the alluvium and the short duration of the flows. Recharge calculation using the Darcy equation was subject to considerable error; but flow net analysis showed the total recharge to be 336 acre-feet per year representing about 50 acre feet per mile of mountain front per year.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Aquifers; Groundwater recharge; Groundwater basins; Geohydrologic units; Watersheds (basins); Arizona; Groundwater; Infiltration; Precipitation (atmospheric); Surface runoff; Geology; Faults (geologic); Arroyos; Joints (geologic); Alluvial fans; Well data; Hydraulic gradient; Flow nets; Water quality; Transmissivity; Darcy's law; Mountains
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGroundwater Recharge from a Portion of the Santa Catalina Mountainsen_US
dc.contributor.authorBelan, R. A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMatlock, W. G.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSoils, Water and Engineering Department, The University of Arizona, Tucsonen_US
dc.date.issued1973-05-05-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe geohydrology of a portion of the Santa Catalina Mountains including the definition of aquifer systems in the foothills was studied in order to calculate groundwater recharge to the Tucson basin. This underlying groundwater aquifer is the only source of Tucson, Arizona's water supply. A well network, well logs, geologic profiles, and a water level contour map were used as source information. Recharge was found to occur in some sections of washes and close to the mountains where washes cross or coincide with faults. Significant recharge to sand and gravel aquifers occurs directly through faults and joints. Little of the surface runoff is thought to recharge local aquifers because of low permeability layers beneath the alluvium and the short duration of the flows. Recharge calculation using the Darcy equation was subject to considerable error; but flow net analysis showed the total recharge to be 336 acre-feet per year representing about 50 acre feet per mile of mountain front per year.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectAquifersen_US
dc.subjectGroundwater rechargeen_US
dc.subjectGroundwater basinsen_US
dc.subjectGeohydrologic unitsen_US
dc.subjectWatersheds (basins)en_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectGroundwateren_US
dc.subjectInfiltrationen_US
dc.subjectPrecipitation (atmospheric)en_US
dc.subjectSurface runoffen_US
dc.subjectGeologyen_US
dc.subjectFaults (geologic)en_US
dc.subjectArroyosen_US
dc.subjectJoints (geologic)en_US
dc.subjectAlluvial fansen_US
dc.subjectWell dataen_US
dc.subjectHydraulic gradienten_US
dc.subjectFlow netsen_US
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.subjectTransmissivityen_US
dc.subjectDarcy's lawen_US
dc.subjectMountainsen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300285-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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