Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300275
Title:
Applicability of the Universal Soil Loss Equation to Semiarid Rangeland Conditions in the Southwest
Author:
Renard, K. G.; Simanton, J. R.; Osborn, H. B.
Affiliation:
United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Western Region, Southwest Watershed Research Center, Tucson, Arizona 85705
Issue Date:
20-Apr-1974
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
An erosion prediction method that has recently received wide attention in the United States is the universal soil loss equation which is given as: a=rklscp. Where a = estimated soil loss (tons/acre/year), r = a rainfall factor, k = a soil erodibility factor, l = a slope length factor, s = a slope gradient factor, c = a cropping-management factor, and p = an erosion control practice factor. Data collected on the walnut gulch experimental watershed in southeastern Arizona were used to estimate these factors for semiarid rangeland conditions. The equation was then tested with data from watersheds of 108 and 372 acres. The predicted value of annual sediment yield was 1.29 tons/acre/year as compared with an average 1.64 tons/acre/year for 4 years of data for the 108-acre watershed, and a sediment yield of 0.39 tons/acre/year was predicted for the 372-acre watershed as compared with the measured value of 0.52 tons/acre/year. Although good agreement was noted between predicted and actual sediment yield, additional work is needed before the equation can be applied to other areas of the southwest.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Sediment yield; Semiarid climates; Erosion rates; Soil erosion; Estimating equations; Arizona; Sediment discharge; Sedimentation rates; Sediments; Sediment load; Ranges; Range management; Southwest U. S.; Rainfall; Surface runoff; Rainfall-runoff relationships; Slopes; Erosion control; Channel morphology; Small watersheds; Erosion; Soil loss; Sediment yield prediction; Walnut gulch experimental Watershed (Ariz); Universal soil loss equation
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleApplicability of the Universal Soil Loss Equation to Semiarid Rangeland Conditions in the Southwesten_US
dc.contributor.authorRenard, K. G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSimanton, J. R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOsborn, H. B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUnited States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Western Region, Southwest Watershed Research Center, Tucson, Arizona 85705en_US
dc.date.issued1974-04-20-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractAn erosion prediction method that has recently received wide attention in the United States is the universal soil loss equation which is given as: a=rklscp. Where a = estimated soil loss (tons/acre/year), r = a rainfall factor, k = a soil erodibility factor, l = a slope length factor, s = a slope gradient factor, c = a cropping-management factor, and p = an erosion control practice factor. Data collected on the walnut gulch experimental watershed in southeastern Arizona were used to estimate these factors for semiarid rangeland conditions. The equation was then tested with data from watersheds of 108 and 372 acres. The predicted value of annual sediment yield was 1.29 tons/acre/year as compared with an average 1.64 tons/acre/year for 4 years of data for the 108-acre watershed, and a sediment yield of 0.39 tons/acre/year was predicted for the 372-acre watershed as compared with the measured value of 0.52 tons/acre/year. Although good agreement was noted between predicted and actual sediment yield, additional work is needed before the equation can be applied to other areas of the southwest.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectSediment yielden_US
dc.subjectSemiarid climatesen_US
dc.subjectErosion ratesen_US
dc.subjectSoil erosionen_US
dc.subjectEstimating equationsen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectSediment dischargeen_US
dc.subjectSedimentation ratesen_US
dc.subjectSedimentsen_US
dc.subjectSediment loaden_US
dc.subjectRangesen_US
dc.subjectRange managementen_US
dc.subjectSouthwest U. S.en_US
dc.subjectRainfallen_US
dc.subjectSurface runoffen_US
dc.subjectRainfall-runoff relationshipsen_US
dc.subjectSlopesen_US
dc.subjectErosion controlen_US
dc.subjectChannel morphologyen_US
dc.subjectSmall watershedsen_US
dc.subjectErosionen_US
dc.subjectSoil lossen_US
dc.subjectSediment yield predictionen_US
dc.subjectWalnut gulch experimental Watershed (Ariz)en_US
dc.subjectUniversal soil loss equationen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300275-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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