Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300261
Title:
Water Disposition in Ephemeral Stream Channels
Author:
Sammis, T. W.
Affiliation:
Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
6-May-1972
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The contribution of flows from small watersheds to groundwater recharge is of interest. Water disposition depends on infiltration and evaporation characteristics. This study had the objective of developing an infiltration equation for estimating transmission losses during a flow event in an ephemeral stream near Tucson, Arizona, in the rocky mountain forest and range experiment station. Palo Verde, desert hackberry, cholla, marmontea and mesquite are the major bank species of the sandy channels. A climatic section consisting of a hydrothermograph recording rain gage and class a evaporation pan was installed. A water balance method was used to estimate evapotranspiration. A specially designed infiltrometer was used to simulate flow events. The data allowed the following conclusions: Philip's infiltration equation is an excellent mathematical model, initial moisture affects initial infiltration rate, the Philip coefficients are determinable by the infiltrometer constructed, soil moisture affects infiltration rates, and transpiration rates diminish linearly proportional to the ratio of available water to field capacity.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Rainfall disposition; Ephemeral streams; Groundwater recharge; Infiltration; Evapotranspiration; Equations; Forecasting; Vegetation; Channels; Climates; Evaporation; Instrumentation; Infiltrometers; Simulation analysis; Soil structure; Field capacity; Arizona; Arid lands; Riparian plants; Transmission losses; Philip's equation
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleWater Disposition in Ephemeral Stream Channelsen_US
dc.contributor.authorSammis, T. W.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentHydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1972-05-06-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe contribution of flows from small watersheds to groundwater recharge is of interest. Water disposition depends on infiltration and evaporation characteristics. This study had the objective of developing an infiltration equation for estimating transmission losses during a flow event in an ephemeral stream near Tucson, Arizona, in the rocky mountain forest and range experiment station. Palo Verde, desert hackberry, cholla, marmontea and mesquite are the major bank species of the sandy channels. A climatic section consisting of a hydrothermograph recording rain gage and class a evaporation pan was installed. A water balance method was used to estimate evapotranspiration. A specially designed infiltrometer was used to simulate flow events. The data allowed the following conclusions: Philip's infiltration equation is an excellent mathematical model, initial moisture affects initial infiltration rate, the Philip coefficients are determinable by the infiltrometer constructed, soil moisture affects infiltration rates, and transpiration rates diminish linearly proportional to the ratio of available water to field capacity.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectRainfall dispositionen_US
dc.subjectEphemeral streamsen_US
dc.subjectGroundwater rechargeen_US
dc.subjectInfiltrationen_US
dc.subjectEvapotranspirationen_US
dc.subjectEquationsen_US
dc.subjectForecastingen_US
dc.subjectVegetationen_US
dc.subjectChannelsen_US
dc.subjectClimatesen_US
dc.subjectEvaporationen_US
dc.subjectInstrumentationen_US
dc.subjectInfiltrometersen_US
dc.subjectSimulation analysisen_US
dc.subjectSoil structureen_US
dc.subjectField capacityen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectArid landsen_US
dc.subjectRiparian plantsen_US
dc.subjectTransmission lossesen_US
dc.subjectPhilip's equationen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300261-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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