Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300240
Title:
Bed Material Characteristics and Transmissions Losses in an Ephemeral Stream
Author:
Murphey, J. B.; Lane, L. J.; Diskin, M. H.
Affiliation:
Southwest Watershed Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Soil and Water Conservation Research Division; Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station, Tucson
Issue Date:
6-May-1972
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
An average of 6 to 13 streamflows from intense summer convective storms occurs annually in the walnut gulch experimental station, 58 square miles in southeastern Arizona. Flows last generally less than 6 hours, and the channels are dry 99 percent of the time. The limiting factors imposed by the geology and geomorphology of the channel to transmission losses of a 6 square mile channel in the station are described. The Precambrian to quaternary geology is outlined, and geomorphology of the channels are described. Volume, porosity and specific yield of alluvium were determined. There is 106 acre-feet of alluvium with a mean specific yield of 28 percent, and a maximum water absorbing capacity of 29 acre-feet or 7 acre-feet per mile of reach. Channel slope is insensitive to changes in geological material beneath it or to changes in flow regime. Channel cross section is highly sensitive to geology and flow regime. Transmission losses were highly correlated to volume of inflow.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Bed load; Channel morphology; Ephemeral streams; Streamflow; Thunderstorms; Convection; Storms; Limiting factors; Geology; Geomorphology; Volume; Porosity; Specific yield; Alluvium; Absorption; Cross sections; Correlation analysis; Arizona; Arid lands; Transmission losses
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBed Material Characteristics and Transmissions Losses in an Ephemeral Streamen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurphey, J. B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLane, L. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDiskin, M. H.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSouthwest Watershed Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Soil and Water Conservation Research Divisionen_US
dc.contributor.departmentArizona Agricultural Experiment Station, Tucsonen_US
dc.date.issued1972-05-06-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractAn average of 6 to 13 streamflows from intense summer convective storms occurs annually in the walnut gulch experimental station, 58 square miles in southeastern Arizona. Flows last generally less than 6 hours, and the channels are dry 99 percent of the time. The limiting factors imposed by the geology and geomorphology of the channel to transmission losses of a 6 square mile channel in the station are described. The Precambrian to quaternary geology is outlined, and geomorphology of the channels are described. Volume, porosity and specific yield of alluvium were determined. There is 106 acre-feet of alluvium with a mean specific yield of 28 percent, and a maximum water absorbing capacity of 29 acre-feet or 7 acre-feet per mile of reach. Channel slope is insensitive to changes in geological material beneath it or to changes in flow regime. Channel cross section is highly sensitive to geology and flow regime. Transmission losses were highly correlated to volume of inflow.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectBed loaden_US
dc.subjectChannel morphologyen_US
dc.subjectEphemeral streamsen_US
dc.subjectStreamflowen_US
dc.subjectThunderstormsen_US
dc.subjectConvectionen_US
dc.subjectStormsen_US
dc.subjectLimiting factorsen_US
dc.subjectGeologyen_US
dc.subjectGeomorphologyen_US
dc.subjectVolumeen_US
dc.subjectPorosityen_US
dc.subjectSpecific yielden_US
dc.subjectAlluviumen_US
dc.subjectAbsorptionen_US
dc.subjectCross sectionsen_US
dc.subjectCorrelation analysisen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectArid landsen_US
dc.subjectTransmission lossesen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300240-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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