Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300212
Title:
Role of Modern Methods of Data Analysis for Interpretation of Hydrologic Data in Arizona
Author:
Kisiel, Chester C.; Duckstein, Lucien; Fogel, Martin M.
Affiliation:
Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721; Department of Systems and Industrial Engineering | Department of Watershed Management
Issue Date:
6-May-1972
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Mathematical models, requiring substantial data, of hydrologic and water resources systems are under intensive investigation. The processes of data analysis and model building are interrelated so that models may be used to forecast for scientific reasons or decision making. Examples are drawn from research on modeling aquifers, watersheds, streamflow and precipitation in Arizona. Classes of problems include model choice, parameter estimates, initial condition, input identification, forecasting, valuation, control, presence of multiple objectives, and uncertainty. Classes of data analysis include correlation methods, system identification, stationarity, independence or randomness, seasonality, event based approach, fitting of probability distributions, and analysis for runs, range and crossing levels. Time series, event based and regression methods are reviewed. The issues discussed are applied to tree-ring analyses, streamflow gaging stations, and digital modeling of small watersheds and the Tucson aquifers.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Hydrologic data; Arizona; Mathematical studies; Statistical methods; Decision making; Water sampling; Model studies; Forecasting; Aquifers; Watersheds; Streamflow; Precipitation (atmospheric); Control; Multiple purpose; Risks; Correlation analysis; Systems analysis; Seasonal; Probability; Ranges; Time series analysis; Regression analysis; Stream gages; Digital computers
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRole of Modern Methods of Data Analysis for Interpretation of Hydrologic Data in Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKisiel, Chester C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDuckstein, Lucienen_US
dc.contributor.authorFogel, Martin M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Systems and Industrial Engineering | Department of Watershed Managementen_US
dc.date.issued1972-05-06-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractMathematical models, requiring substantial data, of hydrologic and water resources systems are under intensive investigation. The processes of data analysis and model building are interrelated so that models may be used to forecast for scientific reasons or decision making. Examples are drawn from research on modeling aquifers, watersheds, streamflow and precipitation in Arizona. Classes of problems include model choice, parameter estimates, initial condition, input identification, forecasting, valuation, control, presence of multiple objectives, and uncertainty. Classes of data analysis include correlation methods, system identification, stationarity, independence or randomness, seasonality, event based approach, fitting of probability distributions, and analysis for runs, range and crossing levels. Time series, event based and regression methods are reviewed. The issues discussed are applied to tree-ring analyses, streamflow gaging stations, and digital modeling of small watersheds and the Tucson aquifers.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectHydrologic dataen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectMathematical studiesen_US
dc.subjectStatistical methodsen_US
dc.subjectDecision makingen_US
dc.subjectWater samplingen_US
dc.subjectModel studiesen_US
dc.subjectForecastingen_US
dc.subjectAquifersen_US
dc.subjectWatershedsen_US
dc.subjectStreamflowen_US
dc.subjectPrecipitation (atmospheric)en_US
dc.subjectControlen_US
dc.subjectMultiple purposeen_US
dc.subjectRisksen_US
dc.subjectCorrelation analysisen_US
dc.subjectSystems analysisen_US
dc.subjectSeasonalen_US
dc.subjectProbabilityen_US
dc.subjectRangesen_US
dc.subjectTime series analysisen_US
dc.subjectRegression analysisen_US
dc.subjectStream gagesen_US
dc.subjectDigital computersen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300212-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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