Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300208
Title:
Effect of a Grass and Soil Filter on Tucson Urban Runoff: A Preliminary Evaluation
Author:
Popkin, Barney Paul
Affiliation:
Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
6-May-1972
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Storm runoff from the Tucson metropolitan area is unsuitable for most uses without processing. A lysimeter comprised of a grass and soil filter was constructed and is being evaluated as a water-quality treatment facility. The lysimeter is 200 feet long, 4 feet wide and 5 feet deep, and contains homogeneous calcareous loam covered by common grasses. Experimental apparatus was installed to divert less than a cubic foot per second of runoff from urbanized Arcadia Watershed. Runoff flows by gravity over the lysimeter, where surface inflow, surface outflow and subsurface outflow are measured and sampled. Four trials, each associated with a discrete runoff event, were conducted in the fall of 1971. Water samples were analyzed for inorganic chemical constituents, chemical oxygen demand (COD), coliforms, turbidity and sediment contents. Subsurface-outflow samples from initial trials were high in COD and total dissolved solids, representing soil flushing or leaching. Concentrations of inorganics reached a maximum value within a few hours of initial seepage, and then decreased. The peaking represents a salt build-up between trials. Concentrations of COD, coliforms, turbidity and sediment in subsurface-outflow samples decreased significantly during each trial. Surface-outflow samples had lower turbidity, COD, bacteria and sediment contents than surface-inflow samples. Turbidity, suspended and volatile solids, coliforms and COD in runoff samples may be reduced by grass and soil filtration. Increased grass development and soil settling work to produce a better quality effluent. Quantification of the lysimeter's effectiveness will be useful for urban watershed management.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Grasses; Soils; Urban runoff; Water quality control; Treatment; Storm runoff; Lysimeters; Loam; Water sampling; Inorganic compounds; Chemical oxygen demand; Coliforms; Turbidity; Sediments; Leaching; Watershed management; Arizona; Arid lands
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffect of a Grass and Soil Filter on Tucson Urban Runoff: A Preliminary Evaluationen_US
dc.contributor.authorPopkin, Barney Paulen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Research Center, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1972-05-06-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractStorm runoff from the Tucson metropolitan area is unsuitable for most uses without processing. A lysimeter comprised of a grass and soil filter was constructed and is being evaluated as a water-quality treatment facility. The lysimeter is 200 feet long, 4 feet wide and 5 feet deep, and contains homogeneous calcareous loam covered by common grasses. Experimental apparatus was installed to divert less than a cubic foot per second of runoff from urbanized Arcadia Watershed. Runoff flows by gravity over the lysimeter, where surface inflow, surface outflow and subsurface outflow are measured and sampled. Four trials, each associated with a discrete runoff event, were conducted in the fall of 1971. Water samples were analyzed for inorganic chemical constituents, chemical oxygen demand (COD), coliforms, turbidity and sediment contents. Subsurface-outflow samples from initial trials were high in COD and total dissolved solids, representing soil flushing or leaching. Concentrations of inorganics reached a maximum value within a few hours of initial seepage, and then decreased. The peaking represents a salt build-up between trials. Concentrations of COD, coliforms, turbidity and sediment in subsurface-outflow samples decreased significantly during each trial. Surface-outflow samples had lower turbidity, COD, bacteria and sediment contents than surface-inflow samples. Turbidity, suspended and volatile solids, coliforms and COD in runoff samples may be reduced by grass and soil filtration. Increased grass development and soil settling work to produce a better quality effluent. Quantification of the lysimeter's effectiveness will be useful for urban watershed management.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectGrassesen_US
dc.subjectSoilsen_US
dc.subjectUrban runoffen_US
dc.subjectWater quality controlen_US
dc.subjectTreatmenten_US
dc.subjectStorm runoffen_US
dc.subjectLysimetersen_US
dc.subjectLoamen_US
dc.subjectWater samplingen_US
dc.subjectInorganic compoundsen_US
dc.subjectChemical oxygen demanden_US
dc.subjectColiformsen_US
dc.subjectTurbidityen_US
dc.subjectSedimentsen_US
dc.subjectLeachingen_US
dc.subjectWatershed managementen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectArid landsen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300208-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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