Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300179
Title:
Evaluation of a Turfgrass - Soil System to Utilize and Purify Municipal Waste Water
Author:
Sidle, R. C.; Johnson, G. V.
Affiliation:
Department of Soils, Water and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
Issue Date:
6-May-1972
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Sewage effluent for irrigation is well established. This study determines the capacity of selective turfgrass-soil systems to purify municipal sewage effluent and to measure the degree of utilization of nitrogen in the effluent by turfgrass. Chlorinated secondarily treated sewage effluent from the city of Tucson was applied to turfgrass grown on sandy loam, silt and loam, under three levels of irrigation under laboratory conditions of duplicate pots. Each pot had 2 suction probes to estimate soil moisture tensions and to allow soil water sampling. The study operated from September to March, 1972, for 30 weeks. Purification efficiency, nitrogen utilization and percent recharge were calculated. Turfgrass can be irrigated with sewage effluent at common rates without hazard of nitrogen pollution to groundwater. Purification efficiency exceeded 90 percent for all irrigation levels on sandy loam and silt. Nitrogen utilization was greater over sandy loam. Turfgrass-soil systems can utilize nitrogen and purify waste water.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Turf grasses; Soil chemical properties; Waste water treatment; Sewage effluent; Nitrogen cycle; Water quality; Water treatment; Irrigation water; Silts; Loam; Soil moisture; Water pollution; Arizona
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEvaluation of a Turfgrass - Soil System to Utilize and Purify Municipal Waste Wateren_US
dc.contributor.authorSidle, R. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, G. V.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Soils, Water and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1972-05-06-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractSewage effluent for irrigation is well established. This study determines the capacity of selective turfgrass-soil systems to purify municipal sewage effluent and to measure the degree of utilization of nitrogen in the effluent by turfgrass. Chlorinated secondarily treated sewage effluent from the city of Tucson was applied to turfgrass grown on sandy loam, silt and loam, under three levels of irrigation under laboratory conditions of duplicate pots. Each pot had 2 suction probes to estimate soil moisture tensions and to allow soil water sampling. The study operated from September to March, 1972, for 30 weeks. Purification efficiency, nitrogen utilization and percent recharge were calculated. Turfgrass can be irrigated with sewage effluent at common rates without hazard of nitrogen pollution to groundwater. Purification efficiency exceeded 90 percent for all irrigation levels on sandy loam and silt. Nitrogen utilization was greater over sandy loam. Turfgrass-soil systems can utilize nitrogen and purify waste water.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectTurf grassesen_US
dc.subjectSoil chemical propertiesen_US
dc.subjectWaste water treatmenten_US
dc.subjectSewage effluenten_US
dc.subjectNitrogen cycleen_US
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.subjectWater treatmenten_US
dc.subjectIrrigation wateren_US
dc.subjectSiltsen_US
dc.subjectLoamen_US
dc.subjectSoil moistureen_US
dc.subjectWater pollutionen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300179-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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