Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300147
Title:
Color It Evaporation
Author:
Dvoracek, M. J.
Affiliation:
Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
6-May-1972
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Evaporation is a major hydrologic process in arid and semiarid lands. A brief review of evaporation literature indicates that a unique parameter, color, is desirable. Artificially colored water was used in a west Texas experiment to monitor evaporation rate and to note the effect of color on evaporation. Artificially green water had a higher evaporation rate than sewage and runoff. Five different colored waters were studied from 1966 to 1970. Color seems to affect the amount of adsorbed radiation as well as the extent of black radiation. The trend for a higher daily rate of evaporation existed for colored waters except during periods of low air temperature. Seven graphs are presented to support these conclusions.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Evaporation; Hydrologic properties; Color; Sewage; Runoff; Radiation; Adsorption; Air temperatures; Texas; Arid lands
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleColor It Evaporationen_US
dc.contributor.authorDvoracek, M. J.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1972-05-06-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractEvaporation is a major hydrologic process in arid and semiarid lands. A brief review of evaporation literature indicates that a unique parameter, color, is desirable. Artificially colored water was used in a west Texas experiment to monitor evaporation rate and to note the effect of color on evaporation. Artificially green water had a higher evaporation rate than sewage and runoff. Five different colored waters were studied from 1966 to 1970. Color seems to affect the amount of adsorbed radiation as well as the extent of black radiation. The trend for a higher daily rate of evaporation existed for colored waters except during periods of low air temperature. Seven graphs are presented to support these conclusions.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectEvaporationen_US
dc.subjectHydrologic propertiesen_US
dc.subjectColoren_US
dc.subjectSewageen_US
dc.subjectRunoffen_US
dc.subjectRadiationen_US
dc.subjectAdsorptionen_US
dc.subjectAir temperaturesen_US
dc.subjectTexasen_US
dc.subjectArid landsen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300147-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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