Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300137
Title:
An Analysis of Yearly Differences in Snowpack Inventory-Prediction Relationships
Author:
Ffolliott, Peter F.; Thorud, David B.; Enz, Richard W.
Affiliation:
Department of Watershed Management, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721; USDA Soil Conservation Service, Phoenix, Arizona 85025
Issue Date:
6-May-1972
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Inventory-prediction relationships between snowpack conditions and forest attributes may be useful in estimating water yields derived from snow, but such relationships are developed usually from source data collected over a short time period. Analyses of long-term data suggest inventory-prediction relationships developed from limited data may have more general application, however. Available records from 18 snow courses in the ponderosa pine type in Arizona provided source data in this study, which was designed to empirically analyze inventory-prediction relationships developed from long-term snow survey records. The primary hypothesis tested and evaluated by statistically analyzing the family of regression equations representing a snow course, was that, given a precipitation input, the distribution of snowpack water equivalent at peak seasonal accumulation is determined by the spatial arrangement of the forest cover, e.g. basal area. Generally 12 of the 18 snow courses evaluated appeared to support the hypothesis, three courses did not, and three courses were considered inconclusive.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Runoff forecasting; Snowpacks; Spatial distribution; Forest management; Vegetation effects; Arizona; Forecasting; Census; Forests; Watershed management; Snow surveys; Water equivalent; Water yield; Snow management; Canopy; Inventory-prediction; Ponderosa pine
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn Analysis of Yearly Differences in Snowpack Inventory-Prediction Relationshipsen_US
dc.contributor.authorFfolliott, Peter F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorThorud, David B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEnz, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Watershed Management, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUSDA Soil Conservation Service, Phoenix, Arizona 85025en_US
dc.date.issued1972-05-06-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractInventory-prediction relationships between snowpack conditions and forest attributes may be useful in estimating water yields derived from snow, but such relationships are developed usually from source data collected over a short time period. Analyses of long-term data suggest inventory-prediction relationships developed from limited data may have more general application, however. Available records from 18 snow courses in the ponderosa pine type in Arizona provided source data in this study, which was designed to empirically analyze inventory-prediction relationships developed from long-term snow survey records. The primary hypothesis tested and evaluated by statistically analyzing the family of regression equations representing a snow course, was that, given a precipitation input, the distribution of snowpack water equivalent at peak seasonal accumulation is determined by the spatial arrangement of the forest cover, e.g. basal area. Generally 12 of the 18 snow courses evaluated appeared to support the hypothesis, three courses did not, and three courses were considered inconclusive.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectRunoff forecastingen_US
dc.subjectSnowpacksen_US
dc.subjectSpatial distributionen_US
dc.subjectForest managementen_US
dc.subjectVegetation effectsen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectForecastingen_US
dc.subjectCensusen_US
dc.subjectForestsen_US
dc.subjectWatershed managementen_US
dc.subjectSnow surveysen_US
dc.subjectWater equivalenten_US
dc.subjectWater yielden_US
dc.subjectSnow managementen_US
dc.subjectCanopyen_US
dc.subjectInventory-predictionen_US
dc.subjectPonderosa pineen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300137-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.