Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300133
Title:
Use and Abuse of Southwestern Rivers: Historic Man - The Anglo
Author:
Fireman, Bert
Affiliation:
Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona
Issue Date:
23-Apr-1971
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The exploitation of southwestern rivers is discussed in the context of American intrusion, acquisition and development of Arizona. The first Americans in the region were beaver trappers who quickly decimated the Sonoran beaver but otherwise wrought little environmental impact. Immediately following the acquisition of the region by the U.S. after the Mexican war, gold miners descended upon it from California. They quickly scarred hills and streams, diverting water for placers, building piles of ugly rubble and logging off entire forests. The large numbers of people and towns that followed created a need for more home grown food products and large storage dams were soon built. When these washed out the stored floodwaters did more sharp, tragic damage downstream than even the seasonal floods of the past. The common municipal practice of dumping raw sewage into waterways soon brought water pollution. Following the national reclamation act of 1902, large dams were soon built on major waterways and the multiple use projects came into existence. Today, even the Indians, in their quest for economic betterment are destroying natural waters. They have learned a major lesson from the whites---the rivers they used only for basic needs a century ago, may be more profitable if overused without regard for tomorrow.
Keywords:
Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; History; River basins; Water resources development; Arid lands; Dams; Arizona; Water conservation; Exploitation
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleUse and Abuse of Southwestern Rivers: Historic Man - The Angloen_US
dc.contributor.authorFireman, Berten_US
dc.contributor.departmentArizona State University, Tempe, Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1971-04-23-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe exploitation of southwestern rivers is discussed in the context of American intrusion, acquisition and development of Arizona. The first Americans in the region were beaver trappers who quickly decimated the Sonoran beaver but otherwise wrought little environmental impact. Immediately following the acquisition of the region by the U.S. after the Mexican war, gold miners descended upon it from California. They quickly scarred hills and streams, diverting water for placers, building piles of ugly rubble and logging off entire forests. The large numbers of people and towns that followed created a need for more home grown food products and large storage dams were soon built. When these washed out the stored floodwaters did more sharp, tragic damage downstream than even the seasonal floods of the past. The common municipal practice of dumping raw sewage into waterways soon brought water pollution. Following the national reclamation act of 1902, large dams were soon built on major waterways and the multiple use projects came into existence. Today, even the Indians, in their quest for economic betterment are destroying natural waters. They have learned a major lesson from the whites---the rivers they used only for basic needs a century ago, may be more profitable if overused without regard for tomorrow.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectRiver basinsen_US
dc.subjectWater resources developmenten_US
dc.subjectArid landsen_US
dc.subjectDamsen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectWater conservationen_US
dc.subjectExploitationen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300133-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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