Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300123
Title:
Progress in Developing Forest Management Guidelines for Increasing Snowpack Water Yields
Author:
Thorud, David B.; Ffolliott, Peter F.
Affiliation:
Department of Watershed Management, University of Arizona, Tucson
Issue Date:
23-Apr-1971
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Snowmelt is a major source of runoff in Arizona for both reservoir systems and groundwater recharge. Because much of the Arizona snowmelt runoff occurs in ponderosa pine forests, it follows that appropriate forest management methods may enhance snowmelt water yield by manipulating tree spacing or overstory density. This paper attempts to establish guidelines for evaluating such forest management practices. Physiographic and climatic factors also affect runoff quantity, and it is conceivable that 2 sites of identical vegetation composition, but different in some combination of these factors might yield quite different amounts of runoff in response to some management practice. A pert network is presented illustrating the investigative framework for such a research effort. The major study activities of the framework are the identifying developing preliminary evaluations and preparing a comprehensive report. Three inventory evaluations to attempt identification of pertinent populations are currently being conducted and are described.
Keywords:
Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Forest management; Snowmelt; Runoff; Water yield improvement; Project planning; Ponderosa pine trees; Vegetation effects; Soil types; Topography; Climatic data; Runoff forecasting; Arizona; Mountains; Pert networks; Runoff efficiency
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleProgress in Developing Forest Management Guidelines for Increasing Snowpack Water Yieldsen_US
dc.contributor.authorThorud, David B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFfolliott, Peter F.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Watershed Management, University of Arizona, Tucsonen_US
dc.date.issued1971-04-23-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractSnowmelt is a major source of runoff in Arizona for both reservoir systems and groundwater recharge. Because much of the Arizona snowmelt runoff occurs in ponderosa pine forests, it follows that appropriate forest management methods may enhance snowmelt water yield by manipulating tree spacing or overstory density. This paper attempts to establish guidelines for evaluating such forest management practices. Physiographic and climatic factors also affect runoff quantity, and it is conceivable that 2 sites of identical vegetation composition, but different in some combination of these factors might yield quite different amounts of runoff in response to some management practice. A pert network is presented illustrating the investigative framework for such a research effort. The major study activities of the framework are the identifying developing preliminary evaluations and preparing a comprehensive report. Three inventory evaluations to attempt identification of pertinent populations are currently being conducted and are described.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectForest managementen_US
dc.subjectSnowmelten_US
dc.subjectRunoffen_US
dc.subjectWater yield improvementen_US
dc.subjectProject planningen_US
dc.subjectPonderosa pine treesen_US
dc.subjectVegetation effectsen_US
dc.subjectSoil typesen_US
dc.subjectTopographyen_US
dc.subjectClimatic dataen_US
dc.subjectRunoff forecastingen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectMountainsen_US
dc.subjectPert networksen_US
dc.subjectRunoff efficiencyen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300123-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.