Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300110
Title:
Seasonal Effects on Soil Drying After Irrigation
Author:
Kimball, B. A.; Jackson, R. D.
Affiliation:
U.S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Soil and Water Conservation Research Division, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Phoenix, Arizona 85040
Issue Date:
23-Apr-1971
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
A study was made to determine how the evaporation rate from a bare Adelanto loam soil in Phoenix changes with season and with time since the last irrigation. The evaporation rates were determined by precision lysimeters in a bare field, with measurements being taken in every month of the year for at least a week after irrigation. The data exhibited a cosine-shaped curve, with a maximum evaporation rate of about 5 mm/day in summer and a minimum rate of about 2 mm/day in winter. By the seventh day, seasonal effects virtually disappear, and the evaporation rate is the same in both summer and winter, being about 2 mm/day after the 7th day and about 0.75 mm/day after the 21st day. It is generally accepted that soil dries in 3 stages, and the transition between the 1st and 2nd stages occurs when atmospheric conditions are no longer critical. In previous laboratory studies of soil drying, with constant atmospheric conditions, stage 1 was easily distinguished from stage II, and these results correlated closely with the equations of Gardner and Hillel. The individual drying curves of this field study were qualitatively different from the laboratory studies and did not confirm the predictions of the equations, suggesting that diurnal variations in temperature and other meteorological parameters have caused the difference.
Keywords:
Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Evaporation; Arid lands; Lysimeter; Soil water movement; Soil moisture; Arizona; Temperature; Drying; On-site data collections; Diurnal; Seasonal; Irrigation; Loam; Soil drying; Potential evaporation; Bare soils
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSeasonal Effects on Soil Drying After Irrigationen_US
dc.contributor.authorKimball, B. A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJackson, R. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentU.S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Soil and Water Conservation Research Division, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Phoenix, Arizona 85040en_US
dc.date.issued1971-04-23-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractA study was made to determine how the evaporation rate from a bare Adelanto loam soil in Phoenix changes with season and with time since the last irrigation. The evaporation rates were determined by precision lysimeters in a bare field, with measurements being taken in every month of the year for at least a week after irrigation. The data exhibited a cosine-shaped curve, with a maximum evaporation rate of about 5 mm/day in summer and a minimum rate of about 2 mm/day in winter. By the seventh day, seasonal effects virtually disappear, and the evaporation rate is the same in both summer and winter, being about 2 mm/day after the 7th day and about 0.75 mm/day after the 21st day. It is generally accepted that soil dries in 3 stages, and the transition between the 1st and 2nd stages occurs when atmospheric conditions are no longer critical. In previous laboratory studies of soil drying, with constant atmospheric conditions, stage 1 was easily distinguished from stage II, and these results correlated closely with the equations of Gardner and Hillel. The individual drying curves of this field study were qualitatively different from the laboratory studies and did not confirm the predictions of the equations, suggesting that diurnal variations in temperature and other meteorological parameters have caused the difference.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectEvaporationen_US
dc.subjectArid landsen_US
dc.subjectLysimeteren_US
dc.subjectSoil water movementen_US
dc.subjectSoil moistureen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectTemperatureen_US
dc.subjectDryingen_US
dc.subjectOn-site data collectionsen_US
dc.subjectDiurnalen_US
dc.subjectSeasonalen_US
dc.subjectIrrigationen_US
dc.subjectLoamen_US
dc.subjectSoil dryingen_US
dc.subjectPotential evaporationen_US
dc.subjectBare soilsen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300110-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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