Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300108
Title:
Sulfuric Acid: Its Potential for Improving Irrigation Water Quality
Author:
Bohn, H. L.; Westerman, R. L.
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soils, University of Arizona, Tucson
Issue Date:
23-Apr-1971
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The 2 major environmental problems of Arizona and the southwest are the alkalinization of soil and water by irrigation and air pollution from copper smelting. It is proposed that the amelioration of both problems may be solved through a common process. This is the production of sulfuric acid from sulfur dioxide, which is the main pollutant of smelter effluent gases. The conversion process is cheap and easy, and the sulfuric acid could then be added to irrigation waters to increase the solubility of CA carbonate in the soil, thereby decreasing alkalinity. Lower alkalinity results in increased soil permeability and increased water use efficiency by plants. The potential market for sulfuric acid in irrigation was calculated, on the basis of neutralizing 90% of the bicarbonate ion concentration in Colorado River water and Arizona well water, to be about 1.6 million tons annually, representing about 1/3 of the sulfur now dissipated by smelters as air pollution. This market includes both the Imperial Valley of California and the Mexicali Valley of Mexico, both of which are currently experiencing mounting salinity problems. Salinity itself is not amenable to this treatment, but the cumulative increase in NA and bicarbonate may be slowed and reversed, leading to gradual soil stabilization.
Keywords:
Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Alkaline soils; Air pollution; Sulfur compounds; Irrigation water; Arid lands; Southwest U.S.; Colorado River; Groundwater; Economic feasibility; Arizona; Sodium; Bicarbonates; Carbonates; Sulfur; Calcium; Soil chemical properties; Water quality; Ion exchange; Sulfuric acid; Sulfur dioxide
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSulfuric Acid: Its Potential for Improving Irrigation Water Qualityen_US
dc.contributor.authorBohn, H. L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWesterman, R. L.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Agricultural Chemistry and Soils, University of Arizona, Tucsonen_US
dc.date.issued1971-04-23-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe 2 major environmental problems of Arizona and the southwest are the alkalinization of soil and water by irrigation and air pollution from copper smelting. It is proposed that the amelioration of both problems may be solved through a common process. This is the production of sulfuric acid from sulfur dioxide, which is the main pollutant of smelter effluent gases. The conversion process is cheap and easy, and the sulfuric acid could then be added to irrigation waters to increase the solubility of CA carbonate in the soil, thereby decreasing alkalinity. Lower alkalinity results in increased soil permeability and increased water use efficiency by plants. The potential market for sulfuric acid in irrigation was calculated, on the basis of neutralizing 90% of the bicarbonate ion concentration in Colorado River water and Arizona well water, to be about 1.6 million tons annually, representing about 1/3 of the sulfur now dissipated by smelters as air pollution. This market includes both the Imperial Valley of California and the Mexicali Valley of Mexico, both of which are currently experiencing mounting salinity problems. Salinity itself is not amenable to this treatment, but the cumulative increase in NA and bicarbonate may be slowed and reversed, leading to gradual soil stabilization.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectAlkaline soilsen_US
dc.subjectAir pollutionen_US
dc.subjectSulfur compoundsen_US
dc.subjectIrrigation wateren_US
dc.subjectArid landsen_US
dc.subjectSouthwest U.S.en_US
dc.subjectColorado Riveren_US
dc.subjectGroundwateren_US
dc.subjectEconomic feasibilityen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectSodiumen_US
dc.subjectBicarbonatesen_US
dc.subjectCarbonatesen_US
dc.subjectSulfuren_US
dc.subjectCalciumen_US
dc.subjectSoil chemical propertiesen_US
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.subjectIon exchangeen_US
dc.subjectSulfuric aciden_US
dc.subjectSulfur dioxideen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300108-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.