Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300106
Title:
Uncertainties in Digital-Computer Modeling of Ground-Water Basins
Author:
Gates, Joseph S.; | Kisiel, Chester C.
Affiliation:
U.S. Geological Survey, Tucson, Arizona; Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
23-Apr-1971
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Much future computer modeling of the responses of groundwater to water development stresses may be poorly done if the errors and limitations of digital models are not fully appreciated by groundwater hydrologists. Two digital models were constructed of the Tucson basin, one with 1,890 nodes of 1/4 square mile area each and one with 509 nodes of 1 square mile each. The starting point for the digital model was the 2-dimensional, linear, parabolic, time-and space-invariant differential equation of incompressible flow through porous media. An explicit finite-difference equivalent was determined, and a set of 1,890 equations were put in implicit form and solved on a computer in less than 20 seconds at a cost of 2.00 dollars. The errors associated with the model are discussed. In deciding what new data collected in the Tucson basin would give the most improvement in the digital model, a statistical decision theory approach was utilized in which expected opportunity loss and expected worth of sample were calculated for 5 variables. The data was computed using about 110 seconds of computer time, costing about 13.00 dollars. This technique has the advantage of including basin dynamics in estimating worth of additional data by means of using the digital model to compute all values of predicted and 'true' water levels included in the loss function.
Keywords:
Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Model studies; Groundwater basins; Computer models; Mathematical studies; Probability; Arid lands; Arizona; Sampling; Decision making; Data processing; Storage coefficient; Transmissivity; Water levels; Discharge (water); Recharge
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleUncertainties in Digital-Computer Modeling of Ground-Water Basinsen_US
dc.contributor.authorGates, Joseph S.en_US
dc.contributor.author| Kisiel, Chester C.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentU.S. Geological Survey, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1971-04-23-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractMuch future computer modeling of the responses of groundwater to water development stresses may be poorly done if the errors and limitations of digital models are not fully appreciated by groundwater hydrologists. Two digital models were constructed of the Tucson basin, one with 1,890 nodes of 1/4 square mile area each and one with 509 nodes of 1 square mile each. The starting point for the digital model was the 2-dimensional, linear, parabolic, time-and space-invariant differential equation of incompressible flow through porous media. An explicit finite-difference equivalent was determined, and a set of 1,890 equations were put in implicit form and solved on a computer in less than 20 seconds at a cost of 2.00 dollars. The errors associated with the model are discussed. In deciding what new data collected in the Tucson basin would give the most improvement in the digital model, a statistical decision theory approach was utilized in which expected opportunity loss and expected worth of sample were calculated for 5 variables. The data was computed using about 110 seconds of computer time, costing about 13.00 dollars. This technique has the advantage of including basin dynamics in estimating worth of additional data by means of using the digital model to compute all values of predicted and 'true' water levels included in the loss function.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectModel studiesen_US
dc.subjectGroundwater basinsen_US
dc.subjectComputer modelsen_US
dc.subjectMathematical studiesen_US
dc.subjectProbabilityen_US
dc.subjectArid landsen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectSamplingen_US
dc.subjectDecision makingen_US
dc.subjectData processingen_US
dc.subjectStorage coefficienten_US
dc.subjectTransmissivityen_US
dc.subjectWater levelsen_US
dc.subjectDischarge (water)en_US
dc.subjectRechargeen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300106-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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