Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300098
Title:
Groundwater Contamination in the Cortaro Area, Pima County, Arizona
Author:
Schmidt, Kenneth D.
Affiliation:
Harshbarger and Associates, Tucson, Arizona
Issue Date:
6-May-1972
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
High concentrations of nitrate have been found in water samples from irrigation wells north of the Tucson Arizona sewage treatment plant. The plant, which had primary treatment prior to 1951, produced 2,800 acre-feet of effluent in 1940, 4,600 acre-feet in 1950, 16,300 acre-feet in 1960, and 33,000 acre-feet in 1970. Large amounts of treated effluent recharge the groundwater system north of the plant. Sources of nitrate contamination beside sewage effluent may be sewage lagoons, sanitary landfills, meat packing and dairy effluent, septic tanks, and agricultural runoff. Sewage effluent is considered to be the primary source of nitrate contamination in the area. Geologic and flow net analysis indicate that aquifer conditions minimize the effects of sewage effluent contamination. Chloride and nitrate migration appears to be similar in the aquifer. Large-capacity wells were sampled to reflect regional conditions, and chemical hydrographs of chloride and nitrate were analyzed. The seasonal nature of these hydrographs patterns depend on total nitrogen in sewage effluent. Management alternatives are suggested to decrease nitrate pollution by sewage effluent.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Groundwater; Water pollution; Nitrates; Irrigation wells; Sewage disposal; Sewage treatment; Effluents; Groundwater recharge; Sewage lagoons; Sanitary engineering; Landfills; Septic tanks; Agricultural runoff; Geologic investigations; Flow nets; Analysis; Chlorides; Water wells; Seasonal; Hydrographs; Water management (applied); Arizona; Arid lands
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGroundwater Contamination in the Cortaro Area, Pima County, Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Kenneth D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentHarshbarger and Associates, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1972-05-06-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractHigh concentrations of nitrate have been found in water samples from irrigation wells north of the Tucson Arizona sewage treatment plant. The plant, which had primary treatment prior to 1951, produced 2,800 acre-feet of effluent in 1940, 4,600 acre-feet in 1950, 16,300 acre-feet in 1960, and 33,000 acre-feet in 1970. Large amounts of treated effluent recharge the groundwater system north of the plant. Sources of nitrate contamination beside sewage effluent may be sewage lagoons, sanitary landfills, meat packing and dairy effluent, septic tanks, and agricultural runoff. Sewage effluent is considered to be the primary source of nitrate contamination in the area. Geologic and flow net analysis indicate that aquifer conditions minimize the effects of sewage effluent contamination. Chloride and nitrate migration appears to be similar in the aquifer. Large-capacity wells were sampled to reflect regional conditions, and chemical hydrographs of chloride and nitrate were analyzed. The seasonal nature of these hydrographs patterns depend on total nitrogen in sewage effluent. Management alternatives are suggested to decrease nitrate pollution by sewage effluent.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectGroundwateren_US
dc.subjectWater pollutionen_US
dc.subjectNitratesen_US
dc.subjectIrrigation wellsen_US
dc.subjectSewage disposalen_US
dc.subjectSewage treatmenten_US
dc.subjectEffluentsen_US
dc.subjectGroundwater rechargeen_US
dc.subjectSewage lagoonsen_US
dc.subjectSanitary engineeringen_US
dc.subjectLandfillsen_US
dc.subjectSeptic tanksen_US
dc.subjectAgricultural runoffen_US
dc.subjectGeologic investigationsen_US
dc.subjectFlow netsen_US
dc.subjectAnalysisen_US
dc.subjectChloridesen_US
dc.subjectWater wellsen_US
dc.subjectSeasonalen_US
dc.subjectHydrographsen_US
dc.subjectWater management (applied)en_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectArid landsen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300098-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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