Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/300095
Title:
Hydrology as a Science?
Author:
Dvoracek, M. J.; Evans, D. D.
Affiliation:
Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
6-May-1972
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Experimental and historical development of the systematic study of water is briefly reviewed to prove hydrology a science. The hydrology program at the university of Arizona is outlined, and details of the course 'water and the environment' are expounded. This introductory course is intended for non-scientific oriented students at this southwestern university. A reading list is provided for the class, and scientifically designed laboratory experiments are developed. The first semester includes discussion of world water inventory; occurrence of water; hydrologic cycle; interaction of oceanography, meteorology, geology, biology, glaciology, geomorphology and soils; properties of water (physical, biological, chemical), and resources development. The second semester discusses municipal, industrial and agricultural water requirements, surface, ground, imported and effluent water resources management; water law; economic, legal, political, and social water resource planning; ecological impact; patterns of use; and survival of man. Mathematical problems are reviewed along with ecological orientation of students.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.; Hydrology; Education; Systems analysis; Southwest U.S.; Arid lands; Water balance; Hydrologic cycle; Oceanography; Meteorology; Geology; Biology; Glaciology; Geomorphology; Soils; Hydrologic properties; Water resources development; Water utilization; Water requirements; Surface waters; Groundwater; Water importing; Effluents; Water management (applied); Water law; Economic impact; Legal aspects; Political aspects; Social aspects; Ecology; Environmental effects; Water users
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHydrology as a Science?en_US
dc.contributor.authorDvoracek, M. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEvans, D. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1972-05-06-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractExperimental and historical development of the systematic study of water is briefly reviewed to prove hydrology a science. The hydrology program at the university of Arizona is outlined, and details of the course 'water and the environment' are expounded. This introductory course is intended for non-scientific oriented students at this southwestern university. A reading list is provided for the class, and scientifically designed laboratory experiments are developed. The first semester includes discussion of world water inventory; occurrence of water; hydrologic cycle; interaction of oceanography, meteorology, geology, biology, glaciology, geomorphology and soils; properties of water (physical, biological, chemical), and resources development. The second semester discusses municipal, industrial and agricultural water requirements, surface, ground, imported and effluent water resources management; water law; economic, legal, political, and social water resource planning; ecological impact; patterns of use; and survival of man. Mathematical problems are reviewed along with ecological orientation of students.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectHydrologyen_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectSystems analysisen_US
dc.subjectSouthwest U.S.en_US
dc.subjectArid landsen_US
dc.subjectWater balanceen_US
dc.subjectHydrologic cycleen_US
dc.subjectOceanographyen_US
dc.subjectMeteorologyen_US
dc.subjectGeologyen_US
dc.subjectBiologyen_US
dc.subjectGlaciologyen_US
dc.subjectGeomorphologyen_US
dc.subjectSoilsen_US
dc.subjectHydrologic propertiesen_US
dc.subjectWater resources developmenten_US
dc.subjectWater utilizationen_US
dc.subjectWater requirementsen_US
dc.subjectSurface watersen_US
dc.subjectGroundwateren_US
dc.subjectWater importingen_US
dc.subjectEffluentsen_US
dc.subjectWater management (applied)en_US
dc.subjectWater lawen_US
dc.subjectEconomic impacten_US
dc.subjectLegal aspectsen_US
dc.subjectPolitical aspectsen_US
dc.subjectSocial aspectsen_US
dc.subjectEcologyen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental effectsen_US
dc.subjectWater usersen_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300095-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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