Origins and Development of the Embryonic Vascular System in Xenopus

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/299095
Title:
Origins and Development of the Embryonic Vascular System in Xenopus
Author:
Myers, Candace Tamara
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Each step of vascular development needs to be carefully regulated; endothelial precursors must be specified, these cells then proliferate and coalesce to form vascular cords, and finally they lumenate, undergo angiogenic branching and remodeling, and recruit smooth muscle cells to establish a mature vessel. An aberration at any of these steps during embryonic development is incompatible with life, and vascular pathologies in the adult are associated with numerous diseases including stroke, arteriosclerosis, diabetic retinopathies and cancer progression. My work has aimed to understand how endothelial precursors are specified, and more precisely the cell-signaling pathways and transcriptional networks that guide their fate. This work leads us to conclude the following: (1) blood island precursor cells in the Xenopus embryo can give rise to either blood or endothelial cells, and it is BMP-mediated activation of the erythroid transcriptional program that regulates cell fate, (2) endothelial specification requires the Ets transcription factor Etv2. Persistence of Etv2 expression in blood/endothelial cell precursors allows these cells to develop into endothelium, and overexpression of Etv2 in any of the three germ layers causes activation of every endothelial marker examined. Along the way we have characterized a number of small-molecule inhibitors that should be useful to the Xenopus community and applicable to other model systems.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
hemangioblast; vasculogenesis; Molecular & Cellular Biology; endothelium
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Molecular & Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Krieg, Paul A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleOrigins and Development of the Embryonic Vascular System in Xenopusen_US
dc.creatorMyers, Candace Tamaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorMyers, Candace Tamaraen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEach step of vascular development needs to be carefully regulated; endothelial precursors must be specified, these cells then proliferate and coalesce to form vascular cords, and finally they lumenate, undergo angiogenic branching and remodeling, and recruit smooth muscle cells to establish a mature vessel. An aberration at any of these steps during embryonic development is incompatible with life, and vascular pathologies in the adult are associated with numerous diseases including stroke, arteriosclerosis, diabetic retinopathies and cancer progression. My work has aimed to understand how endothelial precursors are specified, and more precisely the cell-signaling pathways and transcriptional networks that guide their fate. This work leads us to conclude the following: (1) blood island precursor cells in the Xenopus embryo can give rise to either blood or endothelial cells, and it is BMP-mediated activation of the erythroid transcriptional program that regulates cell fate, (2) endothelial specification requires the Ets transcription factor Etv2. Persistence of Etv2 expression in blood/endothelial cell precursors allows these cells to develop into endothelium, and overexpression of Etv2 in any of the three germ layers causes activation of every endothelial marker examined. Along the way we have characterized a number of small-molecule inhibitors that should be useful to the Xenopus community and applicable to other model systems.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjecthemangioblasten_US
dc.subjectvasculogenesisen_US
dc.subjectMolecular & Cellular Biologyen_US
dc.subjectendotheliumen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular & Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKrieg, Paul A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAntin, Parkeren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCapaldi, Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGregorio, Carolen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcDermott, Kimen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTax, Fransen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKrieg, Paul A.en_US
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