(De)Compose, Shape-Shift, and Suture: Toward a Monstrous Rhetoric of Fan Compositions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/299072
Title:
(De)Compose, Shape-Shift, and Suture: Toward a Monstrous Rhetoric of Fan Compositions
Author:
Howe, Sara K.
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation, "(De)Compose, Shape-Shift, and Suture: Toward a Monstrous Rhetoric of Fan Compositions," argues that the multimodal compositions of fans--specifically, fan fiction, meta, videos, and visual-spatial compositions--are articulations of a new kind of rhetoric: a monstrous rhetoric. This monstrous rhetoric is characterized by the dissolution of textual, corporeal, and cosmological boundaries; intense affective engagement; decomposition and recomposition; shape-shifting; and reanimation. Employing a feminist nomadic research methodology, I rhetorically analyze multiple fan compositions across several online fandoms and explore how these creative works inform and challenge current conversations about embodiment, affect, subjectivity, and composition pedagogy. As a project grounded in pedagogical practice, this dissertation is concerned with how a greater awareness of fan cultures and practices can lead to a greater understanding of what drives and sustains student engagement and participation in the context of an increasingly digital and mobile media landscape. Ultimately, this project offers a new rhetorical framework located at the intersection of fandom and monstrosity, and, from that new framework, a pedagogy of the monstrous, which proffers new strategies for approaching, creating, and analyzing new media and multimodal compositions in college writing classrooms.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kimme Hea, Amy C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.title(De)Compose, Shape-Shift, and Suture: Toward a Monstrous Rhetoric of Fan Compositionsen_US
dc.creatorHowe, Sara K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHowe, Sara K.en_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation, "(De)Compose, Shape-Shift, and Suture: Toward a Monstrous Rhetoric of Fan Compositions," argues that the multimodal compositions of fans--specifically, fan fiction, meta, videos, and visual-spatial compositions--are articulations of a new kind of rhetoric: a monstrous rhetoric. This monstrous rhetoric is characterized by the dissolution of textual, corporeal, and cosmological boundaries; intense affective engagement; decomposition and recomposition; shape-shifting; and reanimation. Employing a feminist nomadic research methodology, I rhetorically analyze multiple fan compositions across several online fandoms and explore how these creative works inform and challenge current conversations about embodiment, affect, subjectivity, and composition pedagogy. As a project grounded in pedagogical practice, this dissertation is concerned with how a greater awareness of fan cultures and practices can lead to a greater understanding of what drives and sustains student engagement and participation in the context of an increasingly digital and mobile media landscape. Ultimately, this project offers a new rhetorical framework located at the intersection of fandom and monstrosity, and, from that new framework, a pedagogy of the monstrous, which proffers new strategies for approaching, creating, and analyzing new media and multimodal compositions in college writing classrooms.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKimme Hea, Amy C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLicona, Adela C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGeary, Adamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKimme Hea, Amy C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcAlister, Ken S.en_US
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