Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/298807
Title:
La ironia en la novelistica de Julio Ramon Ribeyro
Author:
Di Laura, Giancarla
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Irony serves a fundamental function in the discursive structure of the novels of the Peruvian writer Julio Ramon Ribeyro (1929-1994). We find its use through different literary devices at work in his novels. Here we analyze the three Ribeyrian novels within an analytical framework that focuses on rhetoric. That is to say, we use an approach that brings together the works by Peter Roster on the various kinds of irony (verbal irony, dramatic irony, character irony, fate irony, and metaphisical irony), and the works of Lauro Zavala, which analyze the different levels of ennunciation (narrative voice, language, and reader). In his first novel, Cronica de San Gabriel (1960), we analyze dramatic irony. This kind of irony is evident in the narrative voice, which in this case is that of the character of Lucho, an adolescent man who finds himself alone in the world. The reason behind his eventual fall lies in his being witness to the disappearance of the latifundia and a series of tragic events that befall other characters. In his second novel, Los geniecillos dominicales (1965), we study primarily fate irony. This kind of irony occurs when the outcome of an event signals a rupture from that which is hoped or expected. In this particular case, Ludo Totem, the anti-heroic protagonist, endures a number of tragic events which contradict his previous hopes. And it is this Ludo who personifies the deterioration and fall of a fragmented society. In his last novel, Cambio de guardia (1975), we examine metaphysical irony, which concerns itself with the irrevocable contradictions of human existence. This form of irony appears when an action ends in death, and is the result of forces that are beyond human control. In this novel we find different stories that are woven together through fateful encounters, each of which ends in chaos. Ambiguity and the game between appearances and reality are also characteristic of these novels, novels in which the reader plays an active role as he or she decodifies the true message intended by the author.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Literature, Latin American.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Spanish and Portuguese
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Promis, Jose

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoesen_US
dc.titleLa ironia en la novelistica de Julio Ramon Ribeyroen_US
dc.creatorDi Laura, Giancarlaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDi Laura, Giancarlaen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIrony serves a fundamental function in the discursive structure of the novels of the Peruvian writer Julio Ramon Ribeyro (1929-1994). We find its use through different literary devices at work in his novels. Here we analyze the three Ribeyrian novels within an analytical framework that focuses on rhetoric. That is to say, we use an approach that brings together the works by Peter Roster on the various kinds of irony (verbal irony, dramatic irony, character irony, fate irony, and metaphisical irony), and the works of Lauro Zavala, which analyze the different levels of ennunciation (narrative voice, language, and reader). In his first novel, Cronica de San Gabriel (1960), we analyze dramatic irony. This kind of irony is evident in the narrative voice, which in this case is that of the character of Lucho, an adolescent man who finds himself alone in the world. The reason behind his eventual fall lies in his being witness to the disappearance of the latifundia and a series of tragic events that befall other characters. In his second novel, Los geniecillos dominicales (1965), we study primarily fate irony. This kind of irony occurs when the outcome of an event signals a rupture from that which is hoped or expected. In this particular case, Ludo Totem, the anti-heroic protagonist, endures a number of tragic events which contradict his previous hopes. And it is this Ludo who personifies the deterioration and fall of a fragmented society. In his last novel, Cambio de guardia (1975), we examine metaphysical irony, which concerns itself with the irrevocable contradictions of human existence. This form of irony appears when an action ends in death, and is the result of forces that are beyond human control. In this novel we find different stories that are woven together through fateful encounters, each of which ends in chaos. Ambiguity and the game between appearances and reality are also characteristic of these novels, novels in which the reader plays an active role as he or she decodifies the true message intended by the author.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, Latin American.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpanish and Portugueseen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPromis, Joseen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3131595en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4671134xen_US
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