A comparison of honors and nonhonors students in the disciplinary process

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/298789
Title:
A comparison of honors and nonhonors students in the disciplinary process
Author:
Hunn, Veda Lynn
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study assessed the similarities and dissimilarities between Honors and NonHonors student offenders in the disciplinary process and identified characteristics of Honors students who violate university policy. Prior research indicates that students who tend to violate university policy have low grade point averages (GPA). The distinguishing feature of the Honors student, however, is high academic achievement. The data consist of 296 disciplinary cases across two distinct academic years involving Honors and NonHonors students. The groups were compared on the following variables: (a) age, (b) gender, (c) ethnicity, (d) resident status, (e) class standing, (f) type of violation, (g) college enrollment, (h) Honors status, and (i) grade point average. Significant differences between Honors and NonHonors student offenders existed in (a) gender, (b) ethnicity, (c) resident status, (d) type of violation, (e) grade point average, and (f) college enrollment. Significant differences also were associated with class standing, gender, and active versus inactive Honors status. In both the Honors and NonHonors groups, males and Caucasians dominated. The NonHonors offenders tend to be nonresident students, violate alcohol and false information policies, obtain 2.0-2.99 GPAs, and most likely enrolled in the College of Business and Public Administration. In contrast, Honors offenders tend to be resident students, violate alcohol, theft and false information policies, obtain 3.0-3.99 GPAs, and enrolled in the College of Sciences. Active Honors students held the highest GPA followed by inactive Honors students and NonHonors students. Higher GPA was associated with alcohol policy violations, followed by theft and false information violations. These violations are the same top three violations perpetrated by Honors students. Resident status also was associated with GPA. Resident NonHonors students achieved higher GPAs than nonresident NonHonors students. In contrast, nonresident Honors students have higher GPAs than resident Honors students. Gender analyses reveal female offenders have higher GPAs than male offenders. In addition, among the female offenders more females were Honors students than NonHonors students. Finally, freshman GPA is significantly lower than sophomore and junior GPA.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Administration.; Education, Educational Psychology.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McCaslin, Mary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA comparison of honors and nonhonors students in the disciplinary processen_US
dc.creatorHunn, Veda Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.authorHunn, Veda Lynnen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study assessed the similarities and dissimilarities between Honors and NonHonors student offenders in the disciplinary process and identified characteristics of Honors students who violate university policy. Prior research indicates that students who tend to violate university policy have low grade point averages (GPA). The distinguishing feature of the Honors student, however, is high academic achievement. The data consist of 296 disciplinary cases across two distinct academic years involving Honors and NonHonors students. The groups were compared on the following variables: (a) age, (b) gender, (c) ethnicity, (d) resident status, (e) class standing, (f) type of violation, (g) college enrollment, (h) Honors status, and (i) grade point average. Significant differences between Honors and NonHonors student offenders existed in (a) gender, (b) ethnicity, (c) resident status, (d) type of violation, (e) grade point average, and (f) college enrollment. Significant differences also were associated with class standing, gender, and active versus inactive Honors status. In both the Honors and NonHonors groups, males and Caucasians dominated. The NonHonors offenders tend to be nonresident students, violate alcohol and false information policies, obtain 2.0-2.99 GPAs, and most likely enrolled in the College of Business and Public Administration. In contrast, Honors offenders tend to be resident students, violate alcohol, theft and false information policies, obtain 3.0-3.99 GPAs, and enrolled in the College of Sciences. Active Honors students held the highest GPA followed by inactive Honors students and NonHonors students. Higher GPA was associated with alcohol policy violations, followed by theft and false information violations. These violations are the same top three violations perpetrated by Honors students. Resident status also was associated with GPA. Resident NonHonors students achieved higher GPAs than nonresident NonHonors students. In contrast, nonresident Honors students have higher GPAs than resident Honors students. Gender analyses reveal female offenders have higher GPAs than male offenders. In addition, among the female offenders more females were Honors students than NonHonors students. Finally, freshman GPA is significantly lower than sophomore and junior GPA.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Administration.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcCaslin, Maryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3010231en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41612978en_US
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